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hoahamtieu
17-10-2012, 03:29 PM
Short Reading Comprehension Passages

Passage 1 - OPERA

Opera refers to a dramatic art form, originating in Europe, in which the emotional content is conveyed to the audience as much through music, both vocal and instrumental, as it is through the lyrics. By contrast, in musical theater an actor's dramatic performance is primary, and the music plays a lesser role. The drama in opera is presented using the primary elements of theater such as scenery, costumes, and acting. However, the words of the opera, or libretto, are sung rather than spoken. The singers are accompanied by a musical ensemble ranging from a small instrumental ensemble to a full symphonic orchestra.


1. It is pointed out in the reading that opera ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) has developed under the influence of musical theater
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) is a drama sung with the accompaniment of an orchestra
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) is not a high-budget production
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) is often performed in Europe
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) is the most complex of all the performing arts


2. We can understand from the reading that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) people are captivated more by opera than musical theater
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) drama in opera is more important than the music
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) orchestras in operas can vary considerably in size
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) musical theater relies above all on music
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) there is argument over whether the music is important or the words in
opera


3. It is stated in the reading that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) acting and costumes are secondary to music in musical theater
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) many people find musical theater more captivating than opera
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) music in musical theater is not as important as it is in opera
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) an opera requires a huge orchestra as well as a large choir
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) opera doesn't have any properties in common with musical theater


Passage 2 - DOLPHINS

Dolphins are regarded as the friendliest creatures in the sea and stories of them helping drowning sailors have been common since Roman times. The more we learn about dolphins, the more we realize that their society is more complex than people previously imagined. They look after other dolphins when they are ill, care for pregnant mothers and protect the weakest in the community, as we do. Some scientists have suggested that dolphins have a language but it is much more probable that they communicate with each other without needing words. Could any of these mammals be more intelligent than man? Certainly the most common argument in favor of man's superiority over them that we can kill them more easily than they can kill us is the least satisfactory. On the contrary, the more we discover about these remarkable creatures, the less we appear superior when we destroy them.


4. It is clear from the passage that dolphins ----.

<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">A) don't want to be with us as much as we want to be with them
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">B) are proven to be less intelligent than once thought
<input name="q4" value="C" type="radio">C) have a reputation for being friendly to humans
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">D) are the most powerful creatures that live in the oceans
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">E) are capable of learning a language and communicating with humans


5. The fact that the writer of the passage thinks that we can kill dolphins more easily than they can kill us ----.

<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">A) means that they are better adapted to their environment than we are
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">B) shows that dolphins have a very sophisticated form of communication
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">C) proves that dolphins are not the most intelligent species at sea
<input name="q5" value="D" type="radio">D) does not mean that we are superior to them
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">E) proves that Dolphins have linguistic skills far beyond what we
previously thought


6. One can infer from the reading that ----.

<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">A) dolphins are quite abundant in some areas of the world
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">B) communication is the most fascinating aspect of the dolphins
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">C) dolphins have skills that no other living creatures have such as the
ability to think
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">D) it is not usual for dolphins to communicate with each other
<input name="q6" value="E" type="radio">E) dolphins have some social traits that are similar to those of humans


Passage 3 - UNSINKABLE SHIP

Naval architects never claim that a ship is unsinkable, but the sinking of the passenger-and-car ferry Estonia in the Baltic surely should have never have happened. It was well designed and carefully maintained. It carried the proper number of lifeboats. It had been thoroughly inspected the day of its fatal voyage. Yet hours later, the Estonia rolled over and sank in a cold, stormy night. It went down so quickly that most of those on board, caught in their dark, flooding cabins, had no chance to save themselves: Of those who managed to scramble overboard, only 139 survived. The rest died of hypothermia before the rescuers could pluck them from the cold sea. The final death toll amounted to 912 souls. However, there were an unpleasant number of questions about why the Estonia sank and why so many survivors were men in the prime of life, while most of the dead were women, children and the elderly.


7. One can understand from the reading that ----.

<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">A) the lifesaving equipment did not work well and lifeboats could not be
lowered
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">B) design faults and incompetent crew contributed to the sinking of the
Estonia ferry
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">C) 139 people managed to leave the vessel but died in freezing water
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">D) naval architects claimed that the Estonia was unsinkable
<input name="q7" value="E" type="radio">E) most victims were trapped inside the boat as they were in their cabins


8. It is clear from the passage that the survivors of the accident ----.

<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">A) helped one another to overcome the tragedy that had affected them
all
<input name="q8" value="B" type="radio">B) were mostly young men but women, children and the elderly stood little
chance
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">C) helped save hundreds of lives
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">D) are still suffering from severe post-traumatic stress disorder
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">E) told the investigators nothing about the accident

9. According to the passage, when the Estonia sank, ----.

<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">A) there were only 139 passengers on board
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">B) few of the passengers were asleep
<input name="q9" value="C" type="radio">C) there were enough lifeboats for the number of people on board
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">D) faster reaction by the crew could have increased the Estonia's
chances of survival
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">E) all the passengers had already moved out into the open decks


Passage 4 - EROSION IN AMERICA

Erosion of America's farmland by wind and water has been a problem since settlers first put the prairies and grasslands under the plow in the nineteenth century. By the 1930s, more than 282 million acres of farmland were damaged by erosion. After 40 years of conservation efforts, soil erosion has accelerated due to new demands placed on the land by heavy crop production. In the years ahead, soil erosion and the pollution problems it causes are likely to replace petroleum scarcity as the nation's most critical natural resource problem.


10. As we understand from the reading, today, soil erosion in America ----.

<input name="q10" value="" type="radio">A) causes humans to place new demands on the land
<input name="q10" value="B" type="radio">B) is worse than it was in the nineteenth century
<input name="q10" value="" type="radio">C) happens so slowly that it is hardly noticed
<input name="q10" value="" type="radio">D) is the most critical problem that the nation faces
<input name="q10" value="" type="radio">E) is worse in areas which have a lot of petroleum production


11. The author points out in the passage that erosion in America ----.

<input name="q11" value="" type="radio">A) has damaged 282 million acres ever since settlers first put the prairies
and grasslands under the plow
<input name="q11" value="" type="radio">B) has been so severe that it has forced people to abandon their
settlements
<input name="q11" value="" type="radio">C) occurs only in areas with no vegetation
<input name="q11" value="D" type="radio">D) can become a more serious problem in the future
<input name="q11" value="" type="radio">E) was on the decline before 1930s


12. It is pointed out in the reading that in America ----.

<input name="q12" value="" type="radio">A) petroleum is causing heavy soil erosion and pollution problems
<input name="q12" value="" type="radio">B) heavy crop production is necessary to meet the demands and to
prevent a disaster
<input name="q12" value="C" type="radio">C) soil erosion has been hastened due to the overuse of farming lands
<input name="q12" value="" type="radio">D) water is undoubtedly the largest cause of erosion
<input name="q12" value="" type="radio">E) there are many ways to reduce erosion

key:

1. B
2. C
3. C
4. C
5. D
6. E
7. E
8. B
9. C
10. B
11. D
12. C

hoahamtieu
17-10-2012, 03:34 PM
Reading Comprehension Test 1 - Atmosphere of Venus

Data from the Pioneer spacecraft of NASA apparently prove the theory that the high surface temperature of Venus is due to an atmospheric greenhouse effect caused mainly by a blanket of carbon dioxide. Such a greenhouse effect is created when energy in the form of sunlight easily passes through a planet's atmosphere, warms its surface, and is converted to heat radiation that is then held in by the atmosphere from top to bottom. Venus has a relatively thin atmosphere like the Earth's, but Venus' atmosphere consists of more than ninety percent carbon dioxide, compared to less than four percent in that of the Earth. Because of its higher percentage of carbon dioxide, Venus' atmosphere traps much more heat radiation than does the Earth's. Thus, the Venus studies are believed to be important to the understanding of possible adverse effects on the Earth's agriculture that could result from the long-term use of fossil fuels, which add carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.


1. According to the passage, data from the Venus study can be used to ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere accurately
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) increase the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) test the efficiency of the spacecraft sent to Venus by NASA
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) predict future agricultural problems on Earth
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) determine the topography and the surface characteristics of the Earth


2. We understand from the passage that the atmosphere of Venus ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) is thinner than the atmosphere of the Earth
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) contains much more carbon dioxide than that of the Earth
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) traps less heat radiation compared to the atmosphere of the Earth
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) blocks out dangerous rays from the sun
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) is far colder than the atmospheres of other planets in our solar system


3. One can infer from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) there is no difference between the atmospheres of Venus and the
Earth
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) the atmosphere of the Earth consists of mainly carbon dioxide
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) the more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, the warmer the world will
tend to get
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) lack of atmosphere causes a very high surface temperature on Venus
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) Venus had once enjoyed a climate of the sort hospitable to life

Reading Test 2 - How Does Brain Work?


Theories about how brain works remain a topic ofdebate. It is agreed, though, that the hippocampus, a part of the brain, is undeniably important for memory. When we experience something, the information is sent via our senses to the hippocampus, where it is processed. Scientists believe that brain cells called neurons first transform the sensory stimuli we experience into images in our immediate memory. Then, these images are sent to the hippocampus and stored temporarily in short term memory. In the hippocampus information is organized, and it is during this process that parts of the image of our experience fade away. Finally, certain information is then transferred to long term memory in a section in the frontal lobe of the brain known as the cerebral cortex. Scientists think this process may happen while we are sleeping, but exactly how the information is transferred from one area of the brain to another is a mystery.


4. This reading is mainly concerned with ----.

<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">A) how to improve our memory
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">B) why some of the information in short term memory fades away
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">C) illness that results in severe memory loss
<input name="q4" value="D" type="radio">D) how human brain processes and stores information
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">E) the importance of neurons in transferring sensory stimuli


5. According to the passage scientists ----.

<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">A) know that information is sen from the long term memory to the
hippocampus
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">B) have found out why some of the information is lost in the hippocampus
<input name="q5" value="C" type="radio">C) don't know exactly how the information is transferred from one area of
the brain to another
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">D) agree on how the brain works
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">E) still debate whether the hippocampus is important for memory


6. It is pointed out in the reading that ----.

<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">A) the brain was not considered as a highly complex organ in the past
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">B) damage to hippocampus doesn't cause memory loss
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">C) all of the information stored in the short term is transferred to long
time memory
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">D) hippocampus is in the frontal lobe of he brain
<input name="q6" value="E" type="radio">E) scientists agree that the hippocampus is important in processing
information

Reading Comprehension Test 3 - People With Extraordinary Abilities


Fictional stories about people who have extraordinary abilities have always attracted people's attention. One of them is the story of Vera Petrova, who is able to perceive things with different parts of her skin, and through solid walls. One day she comes into his father's office and puts her hands on he door of a locked safe. Suddenly she asks her fa her why he keeps so many old newspapers locked away there. Vera's curious talent is brought to the notice of a scientific research institute and she is given a series of tests by a special commission. During these tests she manages to read a newspaper through an opaque screen and then she describes he figures and colors of a picture hidden under a carpet. During all these tests Vera is blindfold; and, indeed, except when blindfold she lacks the ability to perceive things with her skin. It was also found that although she could perceive things with her fingers this ability ceased the moment her hands were wet.

7. As we understand from the reading, Vera Petrova ----.

<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">A) can only perceive things with her fingers
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">B) is a curious child
<input name="q7" value="C" type="radio">C) is not the only fictional character who has extraordinary abilities
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">D) fails most of the tests administered by a special commission
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">E) perceives the objects only when her fingers are wet


8. It is pointed out in the reading that Vera Petrova loses the ability to perceive objects with her fingers ----.

<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">A) when her father first notices this ability
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">B) when she is asked to read a newspaper through an opaque screen
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">C) after she is given a series of tests
<input name="q8" value="D" type="radio">D) as soon as her hands get wet
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">E) when the object is hidden under a carpet

9. According to the reading, ----.

<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">A) Vera Petrova's father asks her why she keeps the old newspapers in
the locked safe
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">B) the scientific research institute is not interested in Vera Petrova's
talent
<input name="q9" value="C" type="radio">C) Vera can't perceive objects with her skin unless she is blindfold
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">D) there are several scientific research institutes which examine people
like Vera
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">E) the special commission is made up by people who can also perceive
objects with their skin

Reading Test 4 - The Bermuda Triangle

The Bermuda Triangle occupies a disturbing and almost unbelievable place in the world's catalogue of unexplained mysteries. More than a hundred planes and ships have vanished in this area into the air since 1945, and more than a thousand lives have been lost, without a single body or even a piece wreckage from the vanishing planes or ships having been found. Many of the planes concerned have vanished while in normal radio contact with their base until the very moment of their disappearance, while others have radioed the most extraordinary messages, implying that they could not get their instruments to function, that their compasses were spinning, that the sky had turned yellow and hazy on a clear day, and the ocean, which was calm nearby, didn't look right without further clarification of what was wrong.


10. One can infer from the reading that ----.

<input name="q10" value="" type="radio">A) the wreckages of some ships and planes have been found in the
Bermuda Triangle
<input name="q10" value="" type="radio">B) the number of incidents involving lost ships is no larger than that of
any other heavily traveled region of the world
<input name="q10" value="" type="radio">C) the ships. and the planes couldn't contact with their base due to the
lack of equipments
<input name="q10" value="" type="radio">D) the weather in Bermuda Triangle is always stormy
<input name="q10" value="E" type="radio">E) the first mention of disappearances in the area was made in 1945


11. It is pointed out in the passage that ----.

<input name="q11" value="" type="radio">A) thousands of people lost their lives in the Bermuda Triangle in 1945
<input name="q11" value="" type="radio">B) all of the disappearances happened during the day time
<input name="q11" value="" type="radio">C) the Bermuda Triangle mystery was solved in 1945
<input name="q11" value="D" type="radio">D) most of the missing planes could contact with their base by their own
special means until the very moment of disappearing
<input name="q11" value="" type="radio">E) the ocean floor near Bermuda, highly unexplored, is host to many
strange phenomena


12. The reading mainly deals with ----.

<input name="q12" value="" type="radio">A) why so many ships and planes disappear in the Bermuda Triangle
<input name="q12" value="B" type="radio">B) the mysterious disappearances of ships and planes in the Bermuda
Triangle
<input name="q12" value="" type="radio">C) the location of the Bermuda Triangle
<input name="q12" value="" type="radio">D) the frequency of the disappearances in the Bermuda Triangle
<input name="q12" value="" type="radio">E) the unpredictable weather conditions in the Bermuda Triangle

key:

1. D
2. B
3. C
4. D
5. C
6. E
7. C
8. D
9. C
10. E
11. D
12. B

hoahamtieu
17-10-2012, 03:37 PM
SUNSET

When the air is clear, the sunset will appear yellow, because the light from the sun has passed a long distance through air and the blue light has been scattered away. If the air is polluted with small particles, natural or otherwise, the sunset will be more red. Sunsets over the sea may also be orange, due to salt particles in the air. The sky around the sun is seen reddened, as well as the light coming directly from the sun. This is because all light is scattered relatively well through small angles, but blue light is then more likely to be scattered twice over the greater distances, leaving the yellow, red and orange colors.


1. As it is pointed out in the passage, the color of the sunset ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) may be lighter than expected due to salt particles in the air
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) is red if the sky is clear
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) owes its blueness to the distance between the sun and the earth
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) is a combination of all the colors
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) depends on the weather conditions and the location where it takes
place


2. One can infer from the passage that the sunset looks yellow because ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) scattering does not play an appreciable role in determining the color of
the transmitted light
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) the blue light is scattered on the long way through the air at that time
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) the light coming directly from the sun is blue
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) the air is polluted to such a degree that the Earth's climate is actually
changing
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) sunsets generally take place on the sea

3. As it is pointed out in the passage, ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) our eyes are more sensitive to light with blue frequencies
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) the red light passes easily through the air without scattering at all
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) when the sun sets, only the blue light is left
<input name="q3" value="D" type="radio">D) the sunset is likely to look orange when small particles, such as salt
from sea spray, are in the air
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) by the time the light from a sunset gets to you, only red light remains

key:

1. E
2. B
3. D

hoahamtieu
19-10-2012, 05:44 PM
ULTRALIGHT AIRPLANES

An ultralight airplane is very different from a conventional airplane. It looks like a lawn chair with wings, weighs no more than 254 pounds, flies up to 60 miles an hour, and carries about 5 gallons of fuel. Most ultralights are sold as kits and take about 40 hours to assemble. Flying an ultralight is so easy that a pilot with no experience can fly one. Accidents are rarely fatal or even serious because the ultralight lands so slowly and gently and carries so little fuel. Some models now have parachutes attached, while others have parachute packs which pilots can wear.

1. According to the passage, pilots ----.

<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">A) prefer to fly with ultralights rather than with regular aircraft
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">B) can weigh up to 250 pounds, depending on the model of the ultralight
airplane
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">C) don't think that their ultralight airplanes are simple to use
<input name="q4" value="" type="radio">D) are reluctant to put their ultralights together
<input name="q4" value="E" type="radio">E) don't need a special training to fly an ultralight airplane

2. We learn from the passage that an ultralight airplane ----.

<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">A) provides the only opportunity to fly affordably
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">B) doesn't fly very well if it weighs less than 254 pounds
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">C) is inexpensive but difficult to fly
<input name="q5" value="D" type="radio">D) can be put together in a short time
<input name="q5" value="" type="radio">E) is only permitted to be used for private recreational flying

3. It is pointed out in the reading that ----.

<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">A) there is more risk involved in flying ultralight aeroplanes than in flying
general aviation aircraft
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">B) ultralight airplanes can remain airborne for more than an hour
<input name="q6" value="C" type="radio">C) the risk of injury to a passenger in an ultralight airplane is very low
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">D) the gear an ultralight airplane carries can be more fragile than
traditional equipment
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">E) people who fly 'ultralights don't need a license

key:

1. E
2. D
3. C

hoahamtieu
19-10-2012, 05:45 PM
PRACTICE OF MEDICINE

Modern scientific and technological developments in the practice of medicine and public health have drawn nursing into new and wider fields of activity, and its functions have been expanded accordingly. Therefore, nursing is no longer limited mainly to activities within the hospital, or to what is called curative nursing. It has become also a community service in which preventive and rehabilitative functions are a vital part of its program. The modern concept of nursing considers the hospital, however central, as only one of many health agencies in the community.

1. As we understand from the reading, today ----.

<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">A) the only reason people go to hospitals is for nursing care
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">B) most of the nursing practice now takes place in people's homes
<input name="q7" value="C" type="radio">C) hospitals are not the only setting where people receive care or support
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">D) scientific and technological developments can't improve the quality of
care that is delivered in hospitals
<input name="q7" value="" type="radio">E) nursing care is not vital to the core competency of hospitals any more

2. One can infer from the passage that ----.

<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">A) nurses were treating more people in the patient's own home in the past
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">B) hospitals are the only places where nursing care is crucial
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">C) nurses don't see the hospital and clinic as important units in the
community health program
<input name="q8" value="D" type="radio">D) hospitals are still the most important component of the healthcare
sector
<input name="q8" value="" type="radio">E) nursing shortage has had significant consequences during the past few
years

3. According to the passage, the nurse's function has been expanded because of ----.

<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">A) the nurse's activities in the hospital
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">B) hospitals, which are the most common work environments for nurses
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">C) the reluctance of nurses to work in the hospital
<input name="q9" value="" type="radio">D) the necessity of working longer hours
<input name="q9" value="E" type="radio">E) the progress in science and technology in related fields

key:

1. C
2. D
3. E

hoahamtieu
19-10-2012, 05:46 PM
TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS

Much of the blood on the street flows essentially from uncivil behavior of drivers who refuse to respect the legal and moral rights of others. So the massacre on the road may be regarded as a social problem. Safety standards for vehicle have been raised both at the point of manufacture and through periodic road-worthiness inspections. In addition, speed limits have been lowered. Due to these measures, the accident rate has decreased. But the accident experts still worry because there has been little or no improvement in the way drivers behave.

1. According to the passage, traffic accidents may be regarded as a social problem since ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) the motor vehicle is a very dangerous invention
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) the accidents have more to do with hazardous conditions than
hazardous drivers
<input name="q1" value="C" type="radio">C) most of the accidents are caused by drivers who don't pay attention
to the traffic rules
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) the irresponsibility that accounts for much of the problem is not
confined to drivers
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) traffic accidents can cause serious economic damage

2. According to the passage, the number of accidents has fallen because ----.

<input name="q2" value="A" type="radio">A) significant advances have been made towards safer driving
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) many people now know that driving is a skilled task requiring constant
care and concentration
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) drivers are warned to take extra care on the roads
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) drivers have finally learned how to behave
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) there has been improvement in the way drivers behave

3. It is pointed out in the passage that those who violate traffic regulations ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) are the most inexperienced drivers that we have on the roads
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) always blame the road conditions
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) don't have prior traffic violations or crashes on their records
<input name="q3" value="D" type="radio">D) are the biggest threat to those with whom they share the road
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) don't know most of the traffic rules and regulations

key:

1. C
2. A
3. D

hoahamtieu
19-10-2012, 05:48 PM
HUMAN DEVELOPING

When early humans hunted and gathered food, they were not in control of their environment. They could only interact with their surroundings as lower organisms did. When humans learned to make fire, however, they became capable of altering their environment. To provide themselves with fuel they stripped bark from trees, causing the trees to die. Clearings were burned in forests to increase the growth of grass and to provide a greater grazing area for the wild animals that humans fed upon. This development led to farming and the domestication of animals. Fire also provided the means for cooking plants which had previously been inedible. Only when the process of meeting the basic need for food reached a certain level of sophistication was it possible for humans to follow other pursuits such as the founding of cities.

1. This passage is mainly concerned with ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) the evolution of farming techniques
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) the role of hunting as a source of food
<input name="q1" value="C" type="radio">C) how the discovery of fire changed the development of mankind
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) basic food-gathering techniques of early humans
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) how people supplied themselves with food prior to the discovery of how
to make fire

2. One can infer from the passage that the discovery of how to make fire ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) improved the hunting skills of early humans
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) caused early humans to interact with their surroundings as lower
organisms did
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) taught early humans how to live with lower organisms
<input name="q2" value="D" type="radio">D) increased alimentary options for early humans
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) made easier for early humans to gather food

3. As we understand from the passage, early humans ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) didn't eat plants before they learned how to control fire
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) used fire as a tool to alter their surroundings
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) gained better control of their environment when they learned to live
with lower organisms
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) started to maintain their food supply by hunting and gathering food
when they started cooking with fire
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) were the prey of many predators

key:

1. C
2. D
3. B

hoahamtieu
19-10-2012, 05:49 PM
The Great Hanshin Earthquake

The Great Hanshin earthquake, or the Kobe earthquake as it is more commonly known overseas, was an earthquake in Japan that measured 7.2 on the Japanese Scale. It occurred on January 17, 1995 at 5:46 am 52 seconds in the southern part of Hyogo Prefecture and lasted for approximately 20 seconds. The epicenter of the earthquake was on the northern end of Awaji Island, near the cosmopolitan city of Kobe with a population of 1.5 million. A total of 6,433 people, mainly in the city of Kobe, lost their lives. Additionally, it caused approximately ten trillion yen in damage. It is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the costliest natural disaster. It was the worst .earthquake in Japan since the Great Kanto earthquake in 1923, which claimed 140,000 lives.

1. It is stated in the passage that the number of deaths in the city of Kobe ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) was greater than that of Hurricane Katrina
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) was not as high as in the Great Kanto earthquake
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) exceeded that of any known earthquake
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) was extremely high for an earthquake of this magnitude
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) was small due to the type of construction

2. According to the passage, the Kobe earthquake is listed in the Guinness Book of Records because ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) it has been the highest magnitude earthquake recorded so far
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) it lasted less than 20 seconds
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) it caused more financial damage than any other natural disaster in the
world
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) the city of Kobe suffered the highest number of deaths among affected
regions
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) its epicenter was on the northern end of Awaji island

3. We understand from the passage that the Kobe earthquake ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) is internationally known as the Great Hanshin earthquake
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) didn't cause any damage in the neighbourhood of Kobe
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) was the first to cause widespread and serious damage to modern
buildings
<input name="q3" value="D" type="radio">D) is not the deadliest earthquake in the history of Japan
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) had a higher magnitude than the Great Kanto earthquake

key:

1. B
2. C
3. D

hoahamtieu
26-10-2012, 05:12 PM
Mother Tongue

First language, also known as mother tongue, is generally the language a person learns first. However, one can have two or more native languages thus being a native bilingual or indeed multilingual. The order in which these languages are learned is not necessarily the order of proficiency. Incomplete first language skills often make learning other languages difficult. Often a child learns the basics of his or her first language or languages from his or her family. The term mother tongue, however, should not be interpreted to mean that it is the language of one's mother. For instance, in some paternal societies, the wife moves in with the husband and thus may have a different first language or dialect than the local language of the husband. Yet their children usually only speak their local language.

1. According to the passage, first language skills ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) take a very long time to develop
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) play an important role in learning a new language
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) are not transferable to the second language
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) can also have negative effects in foreign language acquisition
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) can aid children only in the beginning stages of learning a second
language

2. We understand from the passage that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) most bilinguals don't have a dominant language
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) the acquisition of a first language is the most complex skill anyone ever learns
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) most children have learning difficulties in acquiring their first language
<input name="q2" value="D" type="radio">D) one's mother tongue might not be the language of the parents
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) it is very rare for bilinguals to have equal competence in both their
languages

3. One can infer from the reading that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) one cannot be a native speaker of more than two languages
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) very few children throughout the world learn to speak two languages
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) it is possible for a bilingual to become more competent in his second
language
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) bilinguals use their two languages for different purposes and functions
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) only a few people learn to speak his or her mother's language like a
native

key:

1. B
2. D
3. C

hoahamtieu
26-10-2012, 05:14 PM
World War I

Many consider World War I to have been the first modern war, a total war where the civilian populations were deliberately endangered as a direct tactic of war, which has continued in all subsequent wars. While civilians have always died in wars, World War I made civilian casualties accepted and commonplace, from, for example, aerial bombardment. All aspects of the societies fighting were affected by the conflict, often causing profound social change, even if the countries were not in the war zone.

1. It is stated in the reading that World War I ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) caused a major depression in countries that were against killing civilians
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) introduced the killing of civilians as a method of warfare
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) is the bloodiest war in history
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) marked the end of the most peaceful period in modern history
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) was not the first war to be fought on a worldly scale

2. It is pointed out in the passage that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) the war's economic impact was felt sharply in countries that were
close to the war zone
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) the aftermath of World War I brought more attempts to protect
civilians in war
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) unlike all subsequent wars, World War I was worldwide
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) more civilians than soldiers were killed in World War I
<input name="q2" value="E" type="radio">E) the impact of the World War I was felt even by the countries which
were not close to the war fronts

3. We can understand from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) very few countries had designed or built aircraft specifically for war
functions before World War I
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) World War I was not the first war in which civilians died
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) many consider World War I the defining moment of modern life
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) the aerial bombardment of civilians was , widely criticized
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) deaths in World War I usually resulted from mistake, accident, or being
too close to a military target

key:

1. B
2. E
3. B

hoahamtieu
26-10-2012, 05:15 PM
STONEHENGE MONUMENT

Stonehenge is an ancient monument situated about ten miles north of Salisbury in England. It was built about 4500 years ago, but by whom and for what purpose remains a mystery. The builders must have known of geometry. They may have been influenced by the Mycenaeans, whose architecture was similar. Some of the stones must have been brought from West Wales, over 135 miles away. These stones weigh more than fifty tons. They may have been brought on rafts and rollers. Experts say that it must have taken 1500 men more than five years to transport them. Stonehenge was probably built in three stages. First, settlers from continental Europe built a temple for sun worship. Later the "Beaker" people added the stone circles. Finally, people of the Wesse Culture transformed Stonehenge into an observatory. They could calculate the exact time of Midsummer and Midwinter and of equinoxes.

1. We understand from the passage that the construction of the Stonehenge ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) began 135 miles away from Salisbury
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) is thought to have taken place in more than one stage
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) was first documented by the Mycenaeans
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">0) is not a mystery that needs to be solved
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) was completed in less than five years

2. It is pointed out in the reading that the Stonehenge ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) was built by the Mycenaeans, who were very advanced in geometry
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) probably has religious origins, possibly for worship of the sun
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) had no astrological purposes
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) was erected thousands of years ago in West Wales
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) is still used to calculate the changes of the seasons

3. According to the passage, there is no certainty about ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) where the Stonehenge was built
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) what kind of stones were used in the construction of the Stonehenge
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) how to calculate the exact time of Midsummer and Midwinter and of
equinoxes
<input name="q3" value="D" type="radio">D) how the stones used in the construction of the Stonehenge were
transported
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) whether some of the stones are in position to reflect the movements of
the sun and the moon

key:

1. B
2. B
3. D

hoahamtieu
26-10-2012, 05:16 PM
What is tic?

A tic is a repeated, impulsive action, reflexive in nature, which the actor feels powerless to control or avoid. Only when the individual performs the tic, is tension and anxiety released within the individual with a tic disorder. Tics can be triggered by an emotional state or sensation, or can happen for no obvious reason. General types of tics include verbal tics, facial tics, and other muscular tics. Physical and psychological therapy and medication can cause tics to go away, often permanently. Muscular tics look something like twitches or quick grimaces, and often affect the eyes and hands. Muscular tics can affect multiple muscles at once. Some forms of stuttering are caused by muscular tics in the throat, tongue, or vocal cords when speaking or preparing to speak.

1. According to the reading, tics ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) are nothing to be fearful of
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) are not voluntary movements and they can't be consciously controlled
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) can be stopped voluntarily for brief periods
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) do not need particular treatment
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) can be triggered by the use of medicinal drugs

2. As it is pointed out in the passage ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) there is usually no need to see the health care provider for a tic
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) a tic can involve only one muscle at a time
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) people with tics often feel relief after the tic is over
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) drugs used to treat tics have a low rate of success
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) the most common cause of a tic is anxiety

3. One can infer from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) anxiety can be a side effect of medication to treat tics
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) the cause may be harder to detect in the case of a facial tic
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) most tics are mild and hardly noticeable
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) although tics are involuntary, the urge sometimes can be suppressed
for short periods with voluntary effort
<input name="q3" value="E" type="radio">E) psychological support may be helpful for those with tics

key:

1. B
2. C
3. E

hoahamtieu
26-10-2012, 05:17 PM
FILMMAKING

In the 1920s, new technology allowed filmmakers to attach to each film a soundtrack of speech, music and sound effects synchronized with the action on the screen. These sound films were initially distinguished by calling them talking pictures, or talkies. The next major step in the development of cinema was the introduction of color. While the addition of sound to film revolutionized the medium, quickly driving out silent movies, color was adopted more gradually. The public was relatively indifferent to color photography as opposed to black-and-white. But as color processes improved and became as affordable as black-and-white film, more and more movies were filmed in color after the end of World War II, as the industry in America came to view color an essential to attracting audiences in its competition with television, which remained a black-and-white medium until the mid-60s. By the end of the 1960s, color had become the norm for filmmakers.

1. We can understand from the passage that the introduction of sound films ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) occurred at the time of the introduction of color films
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) was not easy because it was not affordable
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) made color movies a possibility on a commercial basis
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) was an important milestone in the film industry
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) was delayed until after the end of World War II

2. It is stated in the reading that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) 1920s marked the end to the era of sound films
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) the transition to color films was not as rapid as the transition to sound
films
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) color movies did not appear until the mid- 60s
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) television didn't become popular until the mid-60s
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) color TVs were expensive initially

3. One can understand from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) black-and-white films are still a wonderful source of entertainment
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) the film industry fell into a serious crisis after the end of World War II
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) the' arrival of sound films ended the popularity of silent movies
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) the introduction of color to movies didn't help movie industry in its
competition with television
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) the public was indifferent to sound films

key:

1. D
2. B
3. C

hoahamtieu
26-10-2012, 05:19 PM
Poetry

People seldom feel neutral about poetry. Those who love it sometimes give the impression that it is an adequate substitute for food, shelter, and love. But it isn't. Those who dislike poetry on principle sometimes claim, on the other hand, that poetry is only words and good for nothing. That's not true either. When words represent and recreate genuine human feelings, as they often do in poetry, they can be very important. Poems provide, in fact, a language for feeling, and one of poetry's most insistent merits involves its attempt to express the inexpressible. One of the joys of experiencing poetry occurs when we read a poem and want to say, "yes, that is just what it is like; I know exactly what that line means but I have never been able to express it so well." Poetry can be the voice of our feelings even when our minds are speechless with grief or joy.

1. One can understand from the passage that people ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) seldom feel that poetry is an equivalent for life itself
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) rarely take a biased opinion about poetry
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) generally think that poetry expresses what might otherwise seem
unutterable
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) never differ in their opinions about a poem
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) generally think of poetry as extremely important or totally useless

2. One point made by the author in the passage is that poetry ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) tends to make the reader disappointed
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) is an adequate substitute for food, shelter, and love
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) is only words and good for nothing
<input name="q2" value="D" type="radio">D) often captures real human feelings
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) is impossible to be defined

3. The author points out in the reading that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) poetry is not closely concerned with feelings
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) poems are primarily about how people think rather than how people feel
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) poetry can't be the expression of one's deepest feelings
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) few people think that poetry is neutral
<input name="q3" value="E" type="radio">E) poetry tries to express what people feel but find it hard to describe

key:

1. E
2. D
3. E

hoahamtieu
26-10-2012, 05:20 PM
Nature vs Nurture

People have wondered for a long time how their personalities and behaviors are formed. Two distinct schools of thought on he matter have developed. The two approaches are very different from one another, The controversy is often referred to as nature and nurture, Those who support the nature side of the conflict believe that our personalities and behavior patterns are largely determined by biological and genetic factors. That our environment has little to do with our abilities, characteristics, and behavior is central to this theory. Proponents of the nurture theory claim that our environment is more important than our biologically based instinct in determining how we will act. They see humans as beings whose behavior is almost completely shaped by their surroundings. Neither of these theories can yet fully explain human behavior. In fact, it is quite likely that the key to our behavior lies somewhere between these two extremes. That the controversy will continue for a long time is certain.

1. One can understand from the passage that supporters of the nature theory believe that ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) environment is important in determining a person's behavior and
personality
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) a person's instincts have little effect on his actions
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) it is impossible to explain why we possess certain characteristics and
exhibit certain behaviors
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) biological reasons have a strong influence on how we act
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) there are a lot of similarities between the two theories

2. One point made by the writer in the passage is that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) heredity is more important than the environment in the development
of human beings
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) the correct explanation of human behavior will probably take ideas from
both theories
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) environment is the most important factor in determining personality
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) the behaviorists' view correctly explains how we act
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) biologically based instincts have very little to do with behavior

3. It is stated in the passage that, according to the nurture theory, ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) a trait is always shaped by both genetic dispositions and the
environments in which people develop
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) it is possible to measure the heritability of a trait within a population
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) we are almost completely governed by our instincts
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) human behavior can be predicted based on knowledge of genetics
<input name="q3" value="E" type="radio">E) a person's character is greatly influenced by his environment

key:

1. D
2. B
3. E

hoahamtieu
26-10-2012, 05:22 PM
Common Cold and Flu

Scratchy throats, stuffy noses and body aches all spell misery, but being able to tell if the cause is a cold or flu may make a difference in how long the flu lasts. That's because the prescription drugs available for the flu need to be taken soon after the illness sets in although the symptoms can be eased with over the counter medications. As for colds, the sooner a person starts taking over-the-counter remedy, the sooner relief will come. Cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, runny nose and scratchy throat typically develop gradually, and adults and teens often do not get a fever. On the other hand, fever is one of the characteristic features of the flu for all ages. And in general, flu symptoms including fever and chills, sore throat and body aches come on suddenly and are more severe than cold symptoms.

1. According to the passage, knowing the cause of scratchy throats, stuffy noses and body aches ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) reduces the likelihood of catching cold
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) sometimes doesn't help patients lessen the severity of symptoms
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) encourages patients to buy over-the-counter medications
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) will shorten the duration of the flu
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) prevents people from getting infected

2. According to the passage, to combat the flu effectively, ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) the virus which causes the disease has to be identified
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) patients should only use over-the-counter medications
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) one should take the necessary medications upon catching the disease
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) there is no reason to see a doctor
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) people should try some alternative remedies

3. It is pointed out in the reading that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) fever is the most important feature of a cold
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) flu symptoms are not as severe as cold symptoms
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) the flu can be prevented by the flu vaccine
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) one doesn't need to take any medicine if he has a cold or the flu
<input name="q3" value="E" type="radio">E) over-the-counter drugs can be taken to ease the misery caused by a
cold or the flu

key:

1. D
2. C
3. E

b0c0nganh
27-10-2012, 05:48 PM
Short Reading Comprehension Passages

Passage 2 - DOLPHINS

Dolphins are regarded as the friendliest creatures in the sea and stories of them helping drowning sailors have been common since Roman times. The more we learn about dolphins, the more we realize that their society is more complex than people previously imagined. They look after other dolphins when they are ill, care for pregnant mothers and protect the weakest in the community, as we do. Some scientists have suggested that dolphins have a language but it is much more probable that they communicate with each other without needing words. Could any of these mammals be more intelligent than man? Certainly the most common argument in favor of man's superiority over them that we can kill them more easily than they can kill us is the least satisfactory. On the contrary, the more we discover about these remarkable creatures, the less we appear superior when we destroy them.


6. One can infer from the reading that ----.

<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">A) dolphins are quite abundant in some areas of the world
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">B) communication is the most fascinating aspect of the dolphins
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">C) dolphins have skills that no other living creatures have such as the
ability to think
<input name="q6" value="" type="radio">D) it is not usual for dolphins to communicate with each other
<input name="q6" value="E" type="radio">E) dolphins have some social traits that are similar to those of humans


key:

6. E


Hi bạn. :) Bạn có thể cho mình hỏi câu này được không? :) Câu này mình chọn C nhưng key là E. Mình thấy trong đoạn văn không đề cập đến social traits của dolphin cả :) mà nó có đề cập đến communication between dolphin. Vậy tại sao key là E nhỉ? Mong bạn giải đáp. Thank bạn! :)

hoahamtieu
29-10-2012, 09:36 AM
Bạn b0c0nganh thân mến,

Cảm ơn bạn đã quan tâm đến diễn đàn và có ý tưởng sâu sắc phần đọc hiểu này.

Mình xin tạm dịch đoạn văn trên ra tiếng Việt nhé.

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mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} </style> <![endif]--> Cá heo được xem như động vật biển thân thiện nhất và người ta đã tường tận rất nhiều câu chuyện từ thời La Mã về việc cá heo cứu thuỷ thủ khỏi chết đuối. Càng tìm hiểu về loài cá heo này thì chúng ta càng nhận ra rằng xã hội của chúng/ cộng đồng của chúng phức tạp hơn người ta trước đây từng nghĩ/ từng tưởng tượng ra. Chúng chăm sóc cho đồng loại của mình khi bị bệnh, chăm sóc cho các con cá mẹ đang mang thai và bảo vệ các con cá nhỏ nhất trong cộng đồng của mình, như con người chúng ta vậy. Một số nhà khoa học từng cho biết cá heo cũng có ngôn ngữ nhưng ắt là chúng “giao tiếp” với nhau mà không cần lời nói. Một trong những giống hữu nhũ này có thể thông minh hơn con người chăng? Tất nhiên là lý lẽ thường nghe nhất “ưu ái” hơn về phía con người rằng chúng ta có thể “làm thịt” cá heo dễ dàng hơn cá heo có thể giết hại chúng ta – lý lẽ này ít được hài lòng cho lắm. Trái lại, chúng ta càng khám phá nhiều về các sinh vật nổi bật này thì chúng ta càng ít “lấn át” khi giết chết hay huỷ diệt chúng.


mong bạn vui và cùng đồng hành, gắn bó tiếp với diễn đàn nhé.

Chúc bạn 1 ngày làm việc hiệu quả.

hoahamtieu
01-11-2012, 09:15 AM
Bringing up Children

In bringing up children, every parent, regardless of ethnicity, income, education, or geographic location, watches eagerly the child's acquisition of each new skill. However, it is often tempting to hurry the child beyond his natural learning rate, which can set up dangerous feelings of failure and states of worry in the child. This might happen at any stage. A baby might be forced to use a toilet too early, a young child might be encouraged to learn to read before he knows the meaning of the words he reads. On the other hand, though, if a child is left alone too much, or without any learning opportunities, he loses his natural enthusiasm for life and his desire to find out new things for himself. Parents vary greatly in their degree of strictness towards their children. Some may be especially strict in money matters. Others are severed over times of coming home at night or punctuality for meals. In general, the controls imposed represent the needs of the parents and the values of the community as much as the child's own benefit.

1. According to the passage, in the process of children's learning new skills, parents ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) must encourage them to read before they know the meaning of the
words they read
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) should achieve a balance between pushing them too hard and leaving
them on their own
<input name="q1" value="C" type="radio">C) never expect too much of their children
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) should create as many learning opportunities as possible for themselves
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) must exert strict control over the children

2. It is pointed out in the reading that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) parents should be strict with their children
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) parental controls reflect only the needs of the .parents and the values
of the community
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) parents must maintain strict control over their children's pocket money
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) parents often enforce strict regulations on their children's eating habits
<input name="q2" value="E" type="radio">E) parental restrictions vary, and are not always enforced for the benefit
of the children alone

3. As we understand from the passage, watching the child's acquisition of new skills ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) sets up dangerous states of worry in the parents
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) is universal among parents
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) ensures the security of their children
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) will make him lose interest in learning new things
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) is what parenting is all about

key:

1. B
2. E
3. B

hoahamtieu
01-11-2012, 09:17 AM
Active Passive Smoking

Psychologist George Spilich at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland, decided to find out whether, as many smokers say, smoking helps them to think and concentrate. He put non-smokers, active smokers and smokers deprived of cigarettes through a series of tests. In the first test, each subject sat before a computer screen and pressed a key as soon as he or she recognized a target letter. In this simple test, smokers, deprived smokers and non-smokers performed equally well. The next test was more complex. Non-smokers were faster, but under the stimulation of nicotine, active smokers were faster than deprived smokers. In the third test of short-term memory, non-smokers made the fewest errors, but deprived smokers committed fewer errors than active smokers. In the fourth test, non-smokers were the best and deprived smokers bested those who had smoked a cigarette just before testing. As the tests became more complex, non-smokers performed better than smokers by wider and wider margins.

1. It is pointed out in the passage that the purpose of George Spilich's experiments is ----.

<input name="q1" value="A" type="radio">A) to test whether smoking has a positive effect on the mental capacity
of smokers
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) to show how smoking damages people's mental capacity
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) to prove that smoking affects people's regular performance
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) to show that non~smokers are less productive at work than smokers
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) to prove that nicotine helps people's short term memory

2. We understand from the passage that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) active smokers in general performed better than deprived smokers
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) active smokers responded more quickly than the other subjects in all
tests
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) the other subjects were not better than nonsmokers in the simplest
test
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) deprived smokers gave the slowest responses to the various tasks
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) non-smokers committed more errors than deprived smokers in most of
the tests

3. George Spilich's experiment was conducted in such a way as to ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) check the effectiveness of nicotine on nonsmokers
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) put the subjects through increasingly complex tests
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) finish the tests as quickly as possible
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) force the subjects to recall the words they learned
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) compel the subjects to respond as fast as possible

key:

1. A
2. C
3. B

hoahamtieu
01-11-2012, 09:18 AM
The Difference Between Men And Women

Although there is a great deal of variation within each gender, on the average men and women discuss a surprisingly different range of topics. According to some studies, women and men ranging in age from seventeen to eighty described the range of topics each discussed with friends of the same sex. Certain topics were common to both men and women: work, movies, and television proved to be frequent topics for both groups. The differences between men and women were more striking than the similarities. Female friends spent much more time discussing personal and domestic subjects, relationship problems, family, health and reproductive matters, weight, food and clothing. Men, on the other hand, were more likely to discuss music, current events, sports and business. Women were more likely to gossip about close friends and family. By contrast, men spent more time gossiping about sports figures and media personalities. These differences can lead to frustration when men and women try to converse with one another.

1. It is stated in the passage that women ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) are unwilling to discuss personal subjects
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) are more interested in discussing relationship problems than are men
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) never talk about other men and women
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) don't like gossiping about anything
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) discuss more important issues than men

2. According to the passage, men ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) need to learn to communicate better
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) like talking about movies and television as much as women do
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) are not likely to gossip on anything
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) have no common topics with women
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">El get frustrated more whenever they try to converse with women

3. The passage mainly discusses ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) what women's conversational topics are
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) why men don't like conversing with women
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) the topics men like discussing
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) why women talk more than men
<input name="q3" value="E" type="radio">E) the conversational topics of men and women

key:

1. B
2. B
3. E

hoahamtieu
01-11-2012, 09:20 AM
Student Learning Reading

One of the major processes that takes place in schools, of course, is that students learn. When they graduate from high school, many can use a computer, write essays with three-part theses, and differentiate equations. In addition to learning specific skills, they learn to think critically, to weigh evidence and to develop independent judgment. The extent to which this development takes place is related to both school and home environments. Teachers who are more open to new ideas and less authoritarian produce students who have greater intellectual flexibility and higher achievement test scores. Studies show that teachers are most demanding when they are of the same social class as their students. The greater the difference between their own social class and that of their pupils, the more rigidly they structure their classrooms and the fewer demands they place on their students.

1. It is stated in the passage that teachers who are more open to new ideas ----.

<input name="q1" value="A" type="radio">A) produce more successful students in terms of test scores and
intellectual flexibility
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) often come from a lower social class than their students
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) are more authoritarian towards students
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) discourage intellectual flexibility in schools
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) give students more homework

2. We learn from the reading that when students graduate from high school ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) none of them are able to think critically
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) they can take the overall responsibility of anything
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) all of them have a good knowledge of computer usage
<input name="q2" value="D" type="radio">D) many of them have gained specific skills like writing essays and
differentiating equations
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) most of them lack knowledge because of unavailability of ideal learning
conditions

3. According to the reading, it is true that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) teachers who are from a higher social class than their students should
be hired
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) it is not so difficult to constitute ideal learning conditions
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) with close supervision every student can get high test scores
<input name="q3" value="D" type="radio">D) both the school and home environments greatly influence a student's
achievement inschool
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) students learn best in a rigid classroom environment

key:

1. A
2. D
3. D

hoahamtieu
01-11-2012, 09:21 AM
Fears of Children

Parents teach their children to be fearful and cautious of specific dangers, such as fire or crossing the road. Anxiety can be useful, because it helps protect the child from harm. However, children can be fearful of situations or objects that adults don't consider threatening. The sources of fear may change as the child matures; for example, a fear of the dark or monsters under the bed may give way to fears of burglary or violence. Tactics that don't work include teasing the child for being afraid, or compelling them to confront fearful situations. Helping the child to deal with fear includes taking their feelings seriously, encouraging them to talk about their anxieties, telling them the facts, and giving them the opportunity to confront their fears at their own pace and with your support.

1. It is stated in the article that ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) parents should not teach their children to be cautious of specific
dangers
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) the best way to avoid fears during childhood is to ignore them
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) every single child has a fear of burglary and violence
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) making fun of the child's fears is the best way to get rid of them
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) the fears of the childhood can lead to some other fears in the
adulthood

2. It is clear from the passage that forcing the child to face his fears directly ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) works when the child isn't eager to talk about his fears
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) helps the child to learn the facts and realities
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) may protect him from same certain dangers
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) can be useful with same trivial fears
<input name="q2" value="E" type="radio">E) is not a good way to follow

3. It can be understood from the article that adults ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) prefer to cope with difficult situations at their own pace
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) should talk to the child about his fears in an open and honest way
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">c) may have same fears but may not be aware of them
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) do not want to talk about their own fears unlike children
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) are much more vulnerable to fearful situations than children

key:

1. E
2. E
3. B

hoahamtieu
03-12-2012, 02:31 PM
Panda Bear

Panda is the name for two nocturnal Asian mammals: the red panda and the giant panda. The red panda, also known as lesser panda and cat bear, is found at high elevations in the Himalayas. It resembles a raccoon but has a longer body and tail and a more rounded head. Its thick fur is rust colour to deep chestnut, with black on the under parts, limbs, and ears. The red panda spends much of its time in trees but feeds on the ground, eating primarily bamboo leaves but also fruit and roots. The giant panda superficially resembles a bear. The body is chiefly white, and the limbs are brownish black, with the dark colour extending up over the shoulder. The ears and eye patches are black. Giant pandas live in restricted areas of the high mountain bamboo forests of central China; their diet consists entirely of bamboo shoots. Rare in the wild, they produce young poorly when they are not in their natural environment. Giant pandas are protected by law in China.

1. It can be understood from the passage that ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) all the nocturnal mammals in China are called panda
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) the diets of the red panda and the giant panda are not totally the same
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) there are no pandas in China for the time being
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) the under parts, limbs, and ears of the giant panda are all white
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) bamboo shoots are an important part of the diets of the people living in
China

2. It is clear from the passage that ----.

<input name="q2" value="A" type="radio">A) giant pandas do have breeding problems in captivity
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) the red panda is also called raccoon in the Himalayas
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) the giant panda never spends its time in trees
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) cat bear is a more dangerous animal than the red panda
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) bears and pandas can live together in their natural environment

3. It can be inferred from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="A" type="radio">A) though they share a name, red and giant pandas are not alike in many
ways
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) the number of the bamboo forests of China is decreasing
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) red pandas usually live on chestnuts just like giant pandas
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) it is surprising that the giant pandas are not in danger of becoming
extinct
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) all the mammals at high elevations in the Himalayas are nocturnal

key:

1. B
2. A
3. A

hoahamtieu
03-12-2012, 02:32 PM
Women Taking the Husband's Name

Many women in Western society, aware of the power of names to influence identity, are aware that choosing how to identify themselves alter marriage can be a significant decision. They may follow the tradition of taking their husband's last name, hyphenate their own name and their husband's, or keep their birth name. One fascinating survey reveals that a woman's choice is likely to reveal a great deal about herself and her relationship with her husband. Women who take their husband's name place the most importance on relationships. On the other hand, women who keep their birth names put their personal concerns ahead of relationships and social expectations. Female forms of address influence others' perceptions as well. Research conducted in the late 1980s showed that women who choose the title Ms give the impression of being more achievement oriented, socially self-confident, and dynamic but less interpersonally warm than counterparts who prefer the more traditional forms Miss or Mrs.

1. According to the passage, women who take their husband's name ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) are achievement oriented
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) give importance to their relationship
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) are considered somewhat selfish by others
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) are usually the dominant partner in themarriage
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) don't like to be called by the title Ms

2. We conclude from the passage that the names and titles women choose after getting married ----.

<input name="q2" value="A" type="radio">A) actually reveal a lot about themselves
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) concern others, especially their husbands, a great deal
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">c) have nothing to do with how women perceive their relationships with
their husbands
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) have caused a great concern in Western societies since 1980s
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) show whether they are successful or not

3. it is stated in the passage that women who use the title Ms ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) are generally very warm and sensitive
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) tend to be traditional in their outlook regarding marriage
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) like to show that they are more achievement oriented
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) are somewhat considered as selfish by others
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) are the ones who use both their husband's and their own last name
together

key:

1. B
2. A
3. C

hoahamtieu
03-12-2012, 02:33 PM
Is Tea Beneficial?

Tea had a reputation for being both safe and almost always beneficial. However, scientists are now suggesting that tea may not be as safe as we had previously believed. Tea contains caffeine, and caffeine has been linked to sleeplessness and to the unpleasant jumpy feeling some people get when stressed. More seriously, there is a link between miscarriages, and pregnant women are advised to reduce their intake of tea until after their baby is born. Due its dangerous side-effects, many people who drink a lot of tea solve the problem by drinking a beverage from which the caffeine has been removed, decaffeinated tea, but others claim that it simply doesn't taste right. The sensible course is probably one of moderation: continue to enjoy your cup of tea, but don't enjoy too many!

1. As it is pointed out in the passage, tea used to be considered to be ----.

<input name="q1" value="A" type="radio">A) having no damaging effect on people's health
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) beneficial in moderation
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">c) more dangerous than alcohol
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) causing jumpy feeling if drunk excessively
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) the only drink which people enjoyed in the morning

2. According to the passage, tea can be dangerous because it ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) causes people to suffer from stress more than ever
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) makes all drinkers nervous and unable to sleep
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) reduces miscarriages if it is drunk too much by a pregnant woman
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) may bring about many illnesses that cannot be cured easily
<input name="q2" value="E" type="radio">E) may cause the loss of the baby before it is able to survive

3. The writer points out that the best solution isto drink ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) decaffeinated tea
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) instant coffee
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) tea in moderation
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) other beverages like hot chocolate
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) no tea at all

key:

1. A
2. E
3. C

hoahamtieu
03-12-2012, 02:34 PM
How to Discipline Children's Behaviour

A book has just been published to help parents to deal with their children's naughty behaviour at home. The author, Dr James Bruno, says that the first positive discipline technique is for parents to remain calm because nervous parents don't get good results. Parents who cannot often remain calm find that their children stop taking any notice of them. The second challenge is to know how to correct bad behaviour in an effective way. For instance, punishing children by preventing them from watching their favourite TV program is not an ideal solution. Dr Bruno believes parents should establish clear rules for children to follow. If children refuse to follow these, they know they will be disciplined. Finally, the most effective way of encouraging good behaviour is to give positive feedback as often as possible, to show that it is not only naughtiness that attracts attention.

<ins style="display:inline-table;border:none;height:60px;margin:0;padding:0;p osition:relative;visibility:visible;width:468px"></ins>
1. According to the article, when parents get angry too often, ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) they yell at their children to make them obey an order
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) they tell them off in front of their friends
<input name="q1" value="C" type="radio">C) children often act as if they didn't hear them
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) they utter increasing number of verbal warnings
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) children get scared and obey their parents

2. The author of the book seems to suggest that in order to discipline children, parents first of all should ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) find an effective way to correct their children's behaviour
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) treat them as harshly as possible
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) stop beating them
<input name="q2" value="D" type="radio">D) not lose their temper
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) teach them how they have to behavethemselves

3. We learn from the reading that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) clear rules which are set by the parent must be followed by the
children unconditionally
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) restricting the activities that children like doing is not useful when
disciplining a child
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) giving feedback all the time is not advised when correcting bad
behaviour
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) he book by Dr James Bruno helped the parents a lot who try to
discipline theirnaughty children
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) the best punishment for naughty children hasn't been suggested in Dr
Bruno's book

key:

1. C
2. D
3. B

hoahamtieu
07-12-2012, 11:53 AM
Homeless People

The sad situation of the homeless remains a problem. It is difficult to estimate how many people are homeless because the number depends on how the homeless are defined. There are street people - those who sleep in bus stations, parks, and other areas. Many of these people are youthful runaways. There are the so-called sheltered homeless - those who sleep in government supported or privately funded shelters. Many of these individuals used to live with their families or friends. While street people are almost always single, the sheltered homeless include numerous families with children. Conservatives argue that many homeless are alcoholics, drug users, or mentally ill. In contrast, many liberals argue that homelessness is caused by a reduction in welfare benefits and by excessively priced housing. They want more shelters to be built for the homeless.<ins style="display:inline-table;border:none;height:60px;margin:0;padding:0;p osition:relative;visibility:visible;width:468px"></ins>

1. We can understand from the reading that the number of homeless people ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) is not so great as many people think
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) is on the increase in many countries
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) is counted annually
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) is difficult to know
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) has been decreasing for the past decade

2. According to the passage, liberals ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) think that the problem of homelessness cannot be solved
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) want more shelters for the homeless
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) are of the opinion that most homeless people are mentally ill
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) want the government to ban sleeping on park benches
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) believe that it is not possible to cure the problem of homelessness even
with a consistent government policy

3. It is clearly stated in the reading that the sheltered homeless ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) are mostly youthful runaways
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) sleep in parks or in bus stations
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) can have families with children
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) are generally drug users and alcoholics
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) are in worse conditions than street people

key:

1. D
2. B
3. C

hoahamtieu
10-12-2012, 11:10 AM
Communication in Groups

The sheer number of people in a group affects the amount of communication. Consider the difference between communication between two friends and communication in a group of live people. When triends ıaik, there are two people sending and receiving messages. In a group of live, there are live people doing the same thing. Each idea that is expressed must be understood by four others, who may also choose to respond. Consequently, the greater number of people in a group, the fewer contributions any individual may make. Because there are disadvantages to large groups, you might assume that small groups would be the most effective.However, groups can be too small as well as 100 large. With 100 few members, a group has limited resources, which eliminates a primary advantage of groups for decision making. Also, in very small groups, members may be unwilling lo disagree or criticize each other's ideas. I believe that five to seven members is the ideal size for a small group.

1. We can conclude from the reading that in largegroups ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) there is always a chaos at the end of each discussion
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) no one criticizes each other's ideas
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) before a decision is made everyone has to express their ideas
individually
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) everyone is free to express their ideas as much as they want
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) there is less opportunity for each person to speak

2. According to the passage, small groups ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) are always more successful than large groups in terms of decision
making
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) can have some disadvantages as well
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) express their criticism more freely than large groups
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) have always infinite resources
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) are unable to make a decision at the end of discussions

3. The author of the article suggests that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) the number of people in a small group must not be more than five
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) large groups are always superior to small groups
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) the ideal size for a small group should be five to seven
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) small groups are better as members of them have a chance lo criticize
each other
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) everyone should listen to each other's ideas no matter how large the
group is

key:

1. E
2. B
3. C

hoahamtieu
10-12-2012, 11:11 AM
TV Effects on Children

A recent opinion poll discovered that many people were very concerned about the amount of sex and violence depicted in movies, television shows, and popular music. This poll also discovered, however, that most people thought that individuals should take responsibility to correct the problems. The vast majority favoured such solutions as tighter parental supervision, warning labels on records, and voluntary self-restraints by entertainment companies. Only 27 per cent favoured government censorship. At the same time, there was growing concern about the impact of television on children. Research has shown that by the time our children reach age 18, they have spent more time watching television than in school. The problem was that our television system was attuned to the marketplace. Children are treated as a market to be sold to advertisers at so much money per thousand eyeballs.


1. According to the reading, to prevent the bad effects of television, only a minority ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) support individual action
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) say parents should supervise their children
<input name="q1" value="C" type="radio">C) believe in the necessity of censorship applied by governments
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) think television companies have to control their own programmes
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) require the records be put labels

2. It is stated in the passage that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) many people think pop music videos are not so violent as movies
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) movies today are a good means to show the young the possible
dangers awaiting for them in the real world
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) parents believe there should be more television programmes on
television suitable for the young's sexual education
<input name="q2" value="D" type="radio">D) television has covered more place in an eighteen-year-old teenager's
life than school
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) parents believe schools are the places where our children first learn
what violence is

3. It is emphasized in the reading that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) many children have eyesight problems due to watching television
excessively
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) children are a main focus of the advertisers
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) there are not enough advertisements on television
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) our television programmes should be designed according to our
children's preferences
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) children should learn what to watch on television at school

key:

1. C
2. D
3. B

hoahamtieu
10-12-2012, 11:13 AM
Unconditional Love / Motherly Love

Motherly love by its very nature is unconditional. Mother loves the newborn infant because it is her child, not because the child has fulfilled any specific condition, or lived up to any specific expectations. Unconditional love corresponds to one of the deepest longings, not only of the child, but also of every human being. On the other hand, to be loved because of one's merit or because one deserves it, always leaves doubt and there is always a fear that love could disappear. Furthermore deserved love easily leaves a bitter feeling that one is not loved for himself but is loved only because he pleases, and that he is not loved at all but used. No wonder that we cling to the longing for motherly love, as children and also as adults.

1. One can conclude from the reading that inorder for a mother to love her child, ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) a child has to earn such love
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) the child is expected to do what is requiredfrom him
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) they have to share many memories
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) there are certain specific conditions they both have to follow
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) the child doesn't need to do anything

2. It is understood from the passage that if youare to do something to be loved, ----.

<input name="q2" value="A" type="radio">A) you cannot get as much satisfaction as motherly love
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) you won't have any doubts about the others' feelings towards you
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) it is impossible that you may lose love one day
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) your mother will love you more
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) you can feel confident all the time

3. As it is pointed out in the passage, motherly love ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) is the only love a baby can get
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) is what we need even if we are grown-up
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) is necessary only for children
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) is not related to unconditional love
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) is the kind of love that we lose when wegrow up

key:

1. E
2. A
3. B

hoahamtieu
10-12-2012, 11:15 AM
The Origins Of Written Literature

The origins of a written literature can be found in most of the civilizations of the ancient world; in India, China, and among the Jewish people whose great work of literature is taken to present. The start of Western literature is the Old Testament of the Bible. Their greatest single contribution was drama, a form of literature that has continued undiminished to the present day. Other literary forms that developed from the time of the Greeks and Romans onwards have been Poetry in its many different styles and forms; the essay; biography and autobiography; and the novel.

1. According to the passage, ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) the ancient world was based upon the written literature
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) Bible is submitted to the Jewish people as their holy book
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) Western literature is considered to be constructed upon the Greek
literature
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) Greek literature is not the start of western Chinese and Indian
literatures
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) the origins of the Poetry can be traced back to Jewish literature

2. Written literature ----.

<input name="q2" value="A" type="radio">A) has existed since the civilizations of the ancient world
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) is a branch of drama
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) is established primarily on poetry, biography, autobiography and the
novel
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) is separated into two; oral literature and written literature
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) is as old as the Bible

3. It can be drawn out of the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) holy book Bible is a form of drama
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) although poetry was invented by Greeks and Romans, it was changed
considerably by the Chinese
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) the origin of drama is based upon the Old Testament
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) biography and autobiography are the only branches of Roman and
Greek literature
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) drama has been lasting for centuries contrary to written literature

key:

1. D
2. A
3. C

hoahamtieu
10-12-2012, 11:16 AM
Struggle Against Obesity

Obese people don't want pity and we don't want anything but a hand up so we can get back to work. Some of us would like to contribute and even pay taxes again but we need some assistance. There are all kinds of programs assisting young people to go to school, like student loans and grants. This really large group of our population could benefit from some sort of program that might involve education, liposuction, special footwear, and a part-time personal trainer who would develop individualized solutions for each person. Let's get some intelligent kind of operation going. Let's develop a war on fat.

1. According to the passage, the obese people want ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) a lot of money to live without working
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) assistance to live a normal life
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) some hospitals for cosmetic surgeries toremove their fats
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) to pay taxes for everything that they buy
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) students loan and grant

2. It's understood from the passage that an assistance program ----.

<input name="q2" value="A" type="radio">A) may consist of education, liposuction or special footwear
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) will provide a lot of money to the fats
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) will be available next year
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) is use in all over the country
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) is available only for obese people

3. The author suggests that obese people ---.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) to make war against all kinds of programs
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) to help their peers
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) to struggle against obesity
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) to be more educated
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) fight with the enemy harshly

key:

1. B
2. A
3. C

hoahamtieu
18-12-2012, 03:26 PM
Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice, by far the most popular of all Jane Austen's novels, requires no detailed description. Jane Austen said of it that it "is rather too light, and bright, and sparkling; it wants shade," and this is perhaps the reason for its popularity. The precision and vivacity of style carry the reader through the novel with ease and spirit; there is a sparkling life about the characters and rainwashed freshness about the scenery which combine to make this gayest of Jane Austen's novels, in spite of deeper overtones which emerge when Charlotte Lucas agrees to marry Mr. Collins or when Lydia is discovered to have run off with Wickham with no prospect of marriage. The speed and ski ii with which the author moves into the story is remarkable.

1. According to the passage, Pride and Prejudice ----.

<input name="q1" value="A" type="radio">A) doesn't need elaborate explanation
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) is the most famous novel in English literature
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) doesn't require shade to be understood by the readers
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) is popular due to its vivacity of style
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) doesn't want popularity by the readers

2. It's implied in the passage that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) there is no promising life about the characters in the novel
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) Lydia and Wickham become happy after they have married
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) Charlotte Lucas had an unhappy life with Mr. Collin's
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) Jane Austen doesn't comment on her own book
<input name="q2" value="E" type="radio">E) the landscape of the novel adds lively atmosphere into it

3. Author Jane Austen confessed ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) that she didn't write the novel on her own
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) the reasons why Pride and Prejudice is so popular
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) the ugliness of her novel
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) her own skill and ability to affect public
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) same solutions about Lydia's marriage

key:

1. A
2. E
3. B

hoahamtieu
18-12-2012, 03:27 PM
Experiments on Animals

Life processes are similar in all animals with backbones. So physiologists can find out a lot about the human body by studying animals such as frogs, rats and rabbits. Sometimes research involves the death of these animals. But physiologists take great care not to hurt the animals. The animals are usually put to sleep during the experiments so they do not feel pain. Many people think animals should not be used for experiments. But it is only by physiological research that medicine has been able to advance. Polio is a disease that attacks the nerves. Millions of people have been protected from polio by a fluid called a vaccine. Tissue from monkeys is used to make the vaccine.

1. According to the passage, ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) animals with bones are of no great importance in experimental
researches
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) animals can die if not vaccined by experimental team
<input name="q1" value="C" type="radio">C) although many people resist against animals being utilized in
researches, it is necessary
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) by the help of experimental researches, millions of people have been
protected against rats and frogs
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) rats, frogs and rabbits are grown for only experimental researches

2. Experimental researches ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) are of paramount significance for the polio infected monkeys
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) are the mere way that medicine can progress
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) are carried out to remove infected tissues from the animals
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) include only reptiles to discover the vaccines
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) can be hazardous as much as polio

3. It's clearly stated in the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) millions of people have been killed by polio disease so far
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) physiologists can cure rats, rabbits and frogs as well as people
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) experimental animals are first put to sleep and then used for research
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) monkeys are usually infected with polio
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) the discovery of the remedy to fatal diseases lies in using monkeys

key:

1. C
2. B
3. C

hoahamtieu
18-12-2012, 03:29 PM
Magellan Ferdinand

Magellan is a Portuguese navigator who shared the idea of Christopher Columbus and others that the Far East could be reached by sailing westward. He embarked from Spain in August 1519 with a fleet of five ships, sailed southward down the coast of South America and reached the Pacific Ocean through the Strait named after him. He then gave the Pacific its name, because his first impression of it was one of peace and calm. Magellan was killed by warring tribesmen in the Philippines, but one of his ships finally arrived back in Spain in September 1522 via the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, the first to have circumnavigated the world.

1. According to the passage ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) the name Pacific comes from the harshness and hostility of the Pacific
Ocean
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) Christopher Columbus is also a Portuguese seafarer
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) Magellan had difficulties while fighting with the tribesmen
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) the Portuguese have more audacity than any other nations in the world
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) four of the five ships were destroyed and only one of them was able to
arrive back after 3years

2. Magellan's crew ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) was not as experienced as Christopher Columbus
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) returned alive from his sailing
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) was not alone in his thought about sailing
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) named the Indian and Atlantic Oceans as well as the Pacific
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) thought that the South America was Far East and turned back

3. According to the passage, ----.

<input name="q3" value="A" type="radio">A) Magellan departed from Spain; however, he was not able to return
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) Magellan named the Philippines and the strait
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) Columbus and Magellan discovered the South America and named it
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) the strait Magellan passed through gave him the impression that it was
so calm and peaceful
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) Magellan followed the some route as Columbus

key:

1. E
2. C
3. A

hoahamtieu
18-12-2012, 03:31 PM
Poisonous Snakes

The most dangerous animals on the North American continent, by a margin of 1000 to one, are not bears, mountain lions or wolves but poisonous snakes. Attacks occur far more frequently than most people suspect; 6500 to 7000 humans are bitten by venomous snakes in the United States each year. Fortunately, the death rate from snakebite is low, largely because of widespread knowledge about snakes and the fact that in most cases treatment is prompt. Yet for the victims, even though they survive, the ordeal is a dreadful experience sometimes resulting weeks or months of illness, permanent crippling, the loss of a hand or foot, or other lasting handicaps.

1. The North American continent ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) has the most dangerous animal in the world
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) suffers much from wolves than bears
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) cannot bear mountain lions and wolves
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) is usually subject to poisonous snake attacks
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) can guess the time of attacks of snakes

2. The death rate from snakebite ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) is quite high despite the well-informed people
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) cannot be estimated by citizens in America
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) created much more problems due to lack of knowledge
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) deterred people not to go out during the day
<input name="q2" value="E" type="radio">E) is considered to be small regarding the number of bites

3. According to the passage, snakebite ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) doesn't need immediate treatment
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) usually causes death
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) is a sort of danger for people
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) has only about 6500 victims
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) only creates illness

key:

1. D
2. E
3. C

hoahamtieu
27-12-2012, 09:17 AM
Alcohol And Women Infertility

Alcohol consumption may be linked to a women's risk of infertility, say researches supported by the National Institute of Child Health. In a study of nearly 6000 women, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health looked at Data from those evaluated at seven infertility clinics. After adjusting for other factors that could affect results, such as age and cigarette smoking, researchers found a strong association between alcohol (more than the equivalent of seven cans of beer a week) and infertility due to ovulation problems. The inability to conceive was about 30 percent more likely to occur in women who drank moderately and about 60 percent more likely in women who drank heavily.

1. The researchers supported by the National Institute of Child Health ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) took care of women who're suffering from alcohol
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) have spent a lot of money on fertility
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) have been victims of infertility
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) said alcohol may affect women's fertility
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) have also worked for Harvard University

2. According to the passage, one can assume that women who are infertile, ----.

<input name="q2" value="A" type="radio">A) possibly drink more than seven cans of beer a week
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) are students at Harvard university
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) smoked a lot of cigarettes when they were very young
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) used to go hospitals because of serious problems
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) really don't like babies and some of them hate babies

3. The passage tells us that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) smoking is not as harmful as alcohol
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) a lot of researches have been done on smoking
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) we are unaware of the side-effects of infertility
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) beer is also a kind of alcohol
<input name="q3" value="E" type="radio">E) women who drink heavily have the risk of infertility

key:

1. D
2. A
3. E

hoangti
27-12-2012, 09:18 AM
Thanks

hoahamtieu
03-01-2013, 11:41 AM
Technological Progress Article

Over the past thirty years or so the quality of many people's lives has deteriorated in some respects because of technological progress. Those people living near airports are constantly assailed by the noise of increasingly larger and more powerful jet aircraft taking off and landing. We have ugly buildings which have sprung up in towns and cities. Some of these are blocks of flats-high-rise buildings built because of the high price of land, which seem more like breeding boxes than houses where people have space to live. Worse still, much of our building effort has been channeled into the construction of more and more large office blocks at the expense of much needed housing for the growing urban population.

1. It's obvious in the passage that ----.

<input name="q1" value="A" type="radio">A) the quality of people's lives has declined by technology
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) those people living around airports are happy with their condition
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) technology progressed the life standards
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) airports are usually constructed in urban areas
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) people want to live near airports


2. We have ugly buildings ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) so we need to improve technology
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) because the land is expensive
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) but we don't have much complaint about it
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) where people find enough space to live
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) which have appeared only in rural areas


3. Technological progress ----.

<input name="q3" value="A" type="radio">A) has negative effects on people's lives
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) requires more large office blocks
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) became mu ch faster than expected
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) enabled people to live in large blocks
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) force us to find ways to own land

key:

1. A
2. B
3. A

hoahamtieu
03-01-2013, 11:43 AM
Earthquake Article

Earthquake is a sudden movement in Earth's crust which produces vibration. These vibrations may be detectable only by sensitive instruments called seismographs, or else they may kill thousands as they destroy cities. Many earthquakes are caused when rocks move along faults. Severe earthquakes are most common near the edges of the "plates" in the Earth's crust, such as around the Pacific Ocean, along the mid-Atlantic ridge and in the Mediterranean and South- West Asian regions. They occur when the plates move. So me earthquakes are caused by volcanic action, explosions and other factors, Earthquakes under the sea trigger off huge waves called tsunamis.

1. According to the passage, ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) rocks move when the earthquakes occur
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) seismographs may devastate cities if not detected
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) earthquakes are caused by huge waves called tsunamis
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) earthquakes are more likely to happen where there are faults
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) sudden movements in the earth's crust are called volcanic eruptions

2. It's obvious in the passage that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) many big cities are founded upon the faults
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) big cities are more likely to confront earthquakes
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) the Pacific Ocean is the most likely place for the earthquakes
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) movement of rocks along the faults trigger tsunamis
<input name="q2" value="E" type="radio">E) Earth's most perilous places are the Pacific Ocean, the Mid-Atlantic, South-West Asia and the Mediterranean

3. We can understand from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) some of the volcanic blasts are caused by earthquakes
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) tsunamis are more likely to exist in the Mediterranean and the
Mid-Atlantic
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) severe earthquakes cannot be detected beforehand
<input name="q3" value="D" type="radio">D) movements of plates leads to big earthquakes
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) faults are created by the detectable vibrations

key:

1. D
2. E
3. D

hoahamtieu
03-01-2013, 11:45 AM
Note Taking While Reading

One can write notes either in the novel one is reading or in a separate notebook. The advantage of the former method is that it doesn't disturb one's reading too much; disadvantage is that it spoils a book, it affects one's second reading of the novel, there is not always too much room for the notes in the book. One way round these problems is to write brief notes in pencil in a novel as one is reading, then to copy these up and expand them in a separate notebook. These also allow one to copy out brief extracts from the novel which strike one as important, and it means that you file for future reference only notes about which you have thought a second time after having finished reading the novel.

1. It's stated in the passage that ----.

<input name="q1" value="A" type="radio">A) there is more than one way to take notes
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) writing notes in the novel doesn't harm the book so much
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) taking notes in a separate book has only disadvantages
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) one 's reading too much spoils a book
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) studying a novel is more difficult than reading it in detail

2. According to the passage, ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) writing a novel is more difficult than reading it
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) short notes may be helpful in the future
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) making notes larger is no longer valid for readers
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) one can read either novel or short story easily
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) it's not practical to read a novel twice

3. The main concern of the passage is ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) the methods of reading a book
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) how to cope with problems of reading a novel
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) the notes that are taken while reading a novel
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) the obstacles during writing
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) how to write a good novel

key:

1. A
2. B
3. C

hoahamtieu
03-01-2013, 11:46 AM
Novel - Samuel Richardson

The novel develops, after the death of Defoe, with S.Richardson (1689-1761), a professional printer who took to novel-writing when he was fifty. Richardson liked to help young women with the composition of their love-letters, and was asked by a publisher to write a volume of model letters for use on various occasions. He was inspired to write a novel in the form of a series of letters, a novel which should implant a moral lesson in the minds of its readers (he thought of these readers primarily as women). This novel was Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded, which describes the defamation made on the honour of a virtuous housemaid by a young man.

1. It can be inferred from the passage that S. Richardson ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) is more interested in printing
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) wrote mare than one novel
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) forced the young women to write love-letters
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) became only an expert printer in his life
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) has an important place in the history of literature

2. We learn that Samuel Richardson ----.

<input name="q2" value="A" type="radio">A) aimed at giving moral message to people
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) asked a publisher to write a novel
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) liked being helped by females
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) made chiefly the women read his novels
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) liked to compose his own letters with youngwomen

3. It's implied that Richardson's "Pamela" ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) is composed only of defamation made by a man
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) has more than one title
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) explains the causes of defamation
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) intends to give ethical message to men
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) narrates the life of a corrupt person

key:

1. E
2. A
3. B

hoahamtieu
03-01-2013, 11:47 AM
Aristotle and Galen

Aristotle, who lived from 384 BC to 322 BC, taught that the heart contained the intelligence. Except for a few guesses like this, he observed carefully. He described the habits and the bodily structure (anatomy) of many animals, birds and fish. Another Greek, Galen, who lived in the second century AD, performed biological experiments. Both careful observation of living things and experiments are used today in the study of biology. Galen observed and described the internal anatomy of the human body.-He described many parts that he saw in the body. But he was not always careful. He sometimes described what he expected to see and did not look carefully to see what was really there. For centuries after Galen, people studied anatomy from his books instead of trusting their own observations.

1. It's obvious that Aristotle ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) thinks that it is the brain which contains the intelligence
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) died in his sixties
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) observed only birds and fish
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) is both a great philosopher and a biologist
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) described both the habits and the structure of animals better than
anyone else

2. A Greek scientist, Galen ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) became more successful than Aristotle
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) studied the exterior parts of the body
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) sometimes depended more on his ideas than observation
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) lived in Greece during his whole life-time
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) adapted the works of Aristotle

3. It can be inferred from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) there is a strong link between Galen and Aristotle in terms of friendship
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) Galen studied the external part of the body while Aristotle studied the
internal part
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) the studies of Aristotle couldn't satisfy the expectations of people
<input name="q3" value="D" type="radio">D) Galerrand Aristotle have been influential in the following centuries
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) people never trusted the knowledge of Galen

key:

1. B
2. C
3. D

hoahamtieu
03-01-2013, 01:26 PM
Rousseau and Romantic Movement

Rousseau (1712-78) was one of the forerunners of the Romantic movement, and also one of the prophets of the French Revolution. He was by nature a rebel against existing conceptions of religion, art, education, marriage, government, and in book after book he propounded his own theories on these subjects. Rousseau advocated a return to nature. In the natural state, he held, man is happy and good, and it is only society that, by making life artificial, produces evil. His Emile, a treatise on education, advocated that children should be brought up in an atmosphere of truth, and it condemned the elaborate lies that society imposed on the average child including myths and fairy-stories.

1. According to the passage, Rousseau ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) is the unique person who is a member of the Romantic movement
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) is among the pioneers of the Romantic movement
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) is rebellious against the French Revaluation
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) is the advocate of marriage
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) Emile is one of his daughters who was brought up in an atmosphere of
truth

2. We can conclude that Emile ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) is an essay on education
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) has been thoroughly discussed by academicians
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) has no philosophical background at all
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) is in favor of myths and fairy stories
<input name="q2" value="E" type="radio">E) is a work of Rousseau on how children should be brought up

3. According to Rousseau, by making life artificial ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) Rousseau wrote a treatise on education
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) Rousseau's works produced evil concept
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) civilized man may become happy
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) children can be brought up safely
<input name="q3" value="E" type="radio">E) civilization corrupts the human being

key:

1. B
2. E
3. E

hoahamtieu
03-01-2013, 01:30 PM
Nuclear Danger

Our demand for electricity is climbing so fast that over the next decade our generating capacity must increase by a third. Fossil fuels supply nearly three-quarters of this energy. But the smoke expelling coal, gas, and oil-fired plants are also responsible for half of our air pollution. That might be considered as a small price to pay for progress. But there's an alternative, .one that produces no smoke and can actually create more fuel than it consumes. In many regions it's even cheaper than coal-fired electricity: nuclear power. It may directly bring danger of radioactivity to the mind, but if other types of power didn't present equal and even worse problems, it would make no sense to consider nuclear power at all. But they do.

1. Although 3/4 of the electricity is generated from fossil fuels, ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) we should consider the potential dangers of nuclear power
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) everything has got an expense; and nuclear power's is its radioactivity
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) it may contribute to global warming, the greenhouse effect
<input name="q1" value="D" type="radio">D) half of the air pollution is caused by the plants using them
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) coal also contains a surprising amount of radioactive material

It's claimed in the passage that nuclear power ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) supplies three-quarters of the country's energy demand
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) is less dangerous and cheaper than other types of power
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) is a potential danger because it's radioactive
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) will present us a more polluted environment
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) is more expensive to generate, but not a pollutant

3. In the passage, the writer is worried that in the future ----.

<input name="q3" value="A" type="radio">A) fossil based plants might bring bigger problems than nuclear energy
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) there's not a better alternative than fossil fuels
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) nuclear waste might be more dangerous than air pollution
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) they will have to build nuclear power stations one day
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) there will always be possible dangers of nuclear power

key:

1. D
2. B
3. A

hoahamtieu
03-01-2013, 01:32 PM
Insects and Spiders

Often mistaken for insects, spiders actually belong to a different Cıassification of creatures, called arachnids. They're insects' worst enemies. Although a few species, such as the black widow and the brown recluse, are dangerous, the majority are harmless to humans. Moreover, they can be helpful. Pest control, for example is just one of the many ways spiders can help us. Because they kill far more pests than commercial insecticides do. In the future, perhaps if farmers employ armies of spiders to protect their fields, our grocery bills will be lower and our soil and water and food will have fewer pesticide remains.

1. Unlike many people think, ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) spiders can be used in insecticide industry
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) the black widow is a dangerous species of the spider
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) spiders are the worst enemy of insects
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) same species of spiders are dangerous
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) a spider is not a kind of insect at all

2. The black widow and the brown recluse ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) are often confused with other species of spiders
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) do the greatest harm to soil, water, and food
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) are two of the few dangerous species of spiders
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) don't belong to the classification of creatures called "arachnids."
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) are the most commonly used species of spiders in pest control

3. In the future, agricultural products might be cheaper and healthier if ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) farmers used cheaper commercial insecticides
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) they found an effective way to get rid of spiders
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) some species of spiders weren't so harmful
<input name="q3" value="D" type="radio">D) armies of spiders are employed to protect the fields
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) insecticides destroy all the insects on the field

key:

1. E
2. C
3. D

hoahamtieu
29-01-2013, 08:48 AM
Greek Homer Odyssey Troy

Homer is a Greek epic poet. Both the date and the place of his birth and death are not known precisely, but recent research suggests a date between 1050 and 800 BC. It has even been claimed that no such man as Homer existed and that the Iliad and the Odyssey are collections of traditional ballads and not the work of one man. In any event they were known all over the Greek-speaking world before the sixth century BC. The Iliad is an epic poem dealing with the siege of Troy by the Greeks. The Odyssey describes the wandering of Odysseus, a Greek seafarer, on his way back to Ithaca after the fall of Troy.

1. We can infer from the passage that ----.

<input name="q1" value="A" type="radio">A) it's not definite when and where Homer was born
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) Homer only deals with poetry
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) recent research shows the impossibility of finding Homer's birth date
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) some suggest that he was born in 800 BC
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) Homer's birth place is known but his date of birth is still unknown

2. The Odyssey ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) belongs to another poet rather than Homer
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) explains the voyage of a sailor
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) has no connection with the Iliad
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) doesn't have a specific protagonist
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) is an anonymous work of the Greek nation

3. The works of Homer ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) have no potential readers
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">B) deal with the siege of Troy by the Greeks
<input name="q3" value="C" type="radio">C) have been thought to have different writers
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) are collections of traditional ballads
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) have affected the 6th century people in terms of life style

key:

1. A
2. B
3. C

hoahamtieu
29-01-2013, 08:50 AM
Laura Redden Searing

Can you imagine a deaf woman writing stories about a war? Well, Laura Redden Searing did this. Moreover, she went to foreign countries to write stories. She was very ill when she was 11 years old. Because of this, she lost her hearing. She went to the Missouri School for the Deaf. Laura was 19 years old when she went to work for a newspaper. She wrote about people, places, and art. In 1859, most women were wives and mothers. They did not work outside the home; otherwise, their husbands would be angry. Due to this feeling, Laura used a man's name when she wrote her stories. She called herself Howard Glyndon. She thought that unless she used a man's name, people would be hostile since they did not think that women should write for newspapers. However, she would have no trouble provided that people did not know she was a woman.

1. According to the passage, Laura Redden ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) happened to be ill because of her parents
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) was quite sad when hearing she would be deaf
<input name="q1" value="C" type="radio">C) did something incredible despite her handicap
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) was a deep supporter of feminism during her lifetime
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) wrote mainly about the sufferings of women

2. It is implied in the passage that in the 19thcentury, women ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) were sent to the Missouri School for the Deaf
<input name="q2" value="B" type="radio">B) didn't have as an active role in the society as men
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">C) regarded themselves higher than the males ones
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) didn't agree on what to do for gaining equal status
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) were employed outside their homes as well

3. It is easy to infer from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) Laura wasn't liked by her readers at all
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) writing wasn't an easy task for Laura
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) Howard Glyndon was Laura's close friend
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) being a female was an advantage for being an author
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) mothers and wives were treated in a humane way

key:

1. C
2. B
3. B

hoahamtieu
29-01-2013, 08:51 AM
Adaptation To Change

Sometimes an animal copes with a changed situation, not by adapting to it, but by moving from it to another location. There it may still have to adapt, but the type of adaptation may be easier. There are primitive races of man that have attempted to avoid the pressures or changes that civilization brings. They have had to adjust to living in remote or harsh condition. Examples are the pygmies of the Congo who have escaped into the thickest jungles which are full of dangers. They have learned to obtain a living there and to cope with the hazards savage animals. African bushmen manage to live off the arid Kalahari Desert where there is hardly any other life. Life is tough for the bushmen but they are left in peace. These social adaptations could well lead to biological adaptations over a number of generations, but this is a very slow progress and it is unlikely that any one person would be aware of it taking place.

1. Instead of adaptation, an animal ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) goes around for finding a prey
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">B) prefers not to live in anather environment
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) is in need of food and water
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) must find ways to feed itself
<input name="q1" value="E" type="radio">E) moves into different habitat from time to time

2. Some earliest human beings ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) have nothing to do with adaptation
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) are not primitive at all
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) had to live in distant and unpleasant environment
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) become civilized easily
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) had never tried to beware the changes of civilization

3. It is clear in the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">A) life is hard for the bushmen so they gave up
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) the pygmies of the Congo were subject to the dangers of wild animals
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) Possibly the slow change is stilt taking place in mankind today
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) No man has more difficulties than African bushmen
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) There is no obligation for human beings to find a new environment

key:

1. E
2. C
3. B

hoahamtieu
29-01-2013, 08:53 AM
Gladstone O'Neill Short Article

When he died on November 27,1953, Gladstone O'Neill was universally recognized as one of the major dramatists of the modern world. Four times a Pulitzer Prize-winner, he 'had also been awarded the 1936 Nobel Prize for Literature. His plays have been translated into most major languages and read by more people than those of any other playwright except W. Shakespeare and maybe G. Barnard Shaw. O'Neill was a puzzle to his friends - a genuinely shy, brooding, complicated man in whom cruelty alternated with touching kindness. He was both naive and worldly. One biographer found him "sentimental one instant, hard as nails the next." His widow, after 26 years with O'Neill, said, "To understand his work you must understand the man, for the work and the man are one."

1. According to the passage, O'Neill ----.

<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">A) knew nearly all the important dramatists of the modern world
<input name="q1" value="B" type="radio">B) passed away in the 20th century
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">C) only had been awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">D) knew more than four languages
<input name="q1" value="" type="radio">E) wasn't reserved and complicated

2. We can infer from the passage that ----.

<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">A) O'Neill's cruelty affected his friends very much
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">B) not only Shakespeare but Bernard Shaw appreciated his works
<input name="q2" value="C" type="radio">C) O'Neill sometimes had childlike behavior
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">D) his wife can't understand O'Neill, either
<input name="q2" value="" type="radio">E) O'Neill has very simple character so that he can easily be understood

3. We can easily infer from the passage that ----.

<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">Al his wife divorced O'Neill after 26 years-long marriage
<input name="q3" value="B" type="radio">B) there's a Cıose connection between O'Neill and his works
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">C) it's not necessary to understand him in order to understand his works
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">D) he was emotional, not so strict man
<input name="q3" value="" type="radio">E) his plays were not understood by many of the great writers

key:

1. B
2. C
3. B