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Chủ đề: Tìm hiểu bột màu, vật liệu, phương pháp... làm đồ chơi giống thật

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    Tìm hiểu bột màu, vật liệu, phương pháp... làm đồ chơi giống thật

    Chất làm thực phẩm có độ trong suốt: Krylon Triple Thick Crystal Clear glaze



    How to Make Drinks (Beer, milk, lemonade, coffee) for Miniature Dollhouse scene. By Garden of Imagination

    Lần sửa cuối bởi obaasan, ngày 16-06-2012 lúc 07:54 AM.
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    Re: Tìm hiểu bột màu, vật liệu, phương pháp... làm đồ chơi giống thật

    If you’re new to 1/144, you may be hearing about some supplies that are staples of the teeny-tiny world, but you don’t know what they are, where to get them, or how they’re used.
    No hole beads (sometimes called “microbeads”) are one of those staples. No hole beads are tiny glass balls (and I do mean tiny) that come in a variety of finishes — everything from clear glass to metallics (gold, silver, copper) and a rainbow of colors.
    No hole beads come in two common sizes 1mm and 1/2mm… at least that is how they are labeled. What you will find when viewing no hole beads under magnification, is that those labels are an “average” — you really get a much wider variety of sizes.
    What size are these beads in scale (1/144)? If you check the conversion chart, you’ll see that 1mm is approximately 6 inches and 1/2mm is approximately 3 inches.
    Potential Uses
    And if there’s a color you want, but don’t have, you can even paint them. I’ve found the best way to paint them is to wrap blue painter’s tape (found in the paint department of hardware/home improvement stores) sticky side up, around a block of wood. Then pour more no hole beads than you need on the tape. Once the beads are stuck to the tape, apply paint and allow to dry. Rub the beads to remove them from the tape — some beads will lose paint, but that’s why you do extras.
    Working with No Hole Beads
    Plan on a LOT of these beads flying from your grasp, never to be seen again. It happens. There are two main ways of
    picking up these beads — the first is the most obvious, tweezers. But you need a good pair of tweezers, most cheap tweezers don’t have fine enough tips to work with these tiny rascals.
    The second, less obvious way, is inexpensive and you probably have what you need in your house. Spaghetti — just moisten one tip and pick up beads like a pro. Toothpicks also work (once you moisten the tip). The “spaghetti tip” is the type of great info you’ll pick up off the MicroMinis Group.

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    Re: Tìm hiểu bột màu, vật liệu, phương pháp... làm đồ chơi giống thật

    Simulate Water and Liquids with Epoxy Resin

    By Lesley Shepherd, About.com Guide

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    Dollhouse miniatures using Epoxy Resin
    Lesley Shepherd



    Introduction to Epoxy Resin:

    Miniaturists use epoxy resins to simulate water and other liquids. If you have marvelled at various drinks, glossy sauces on food, raw eggs, soups or spilled or melted liquids in dollhouse miniatures, or seen beautiful water effects in railroad or scale scenes, you may have been looking at items which used epoxy resins. When these resins cure, they are hard, very shiny and durable. They can be poured in layers in order to create effects of deeper water.
    Only 1/8 to ¼ inch of material should be poured in one pour. These materials do not work well for deep containers or water depths unless a series of pours are used.

    What are Epoxy Resins?:

    Epoxy Resins are two part high gloss coatings sold in craft shops, plastic stores and stores which sell boat and wood finishes. Their main purpose is as a durable, high gloss, pour on finish. The resin comes as a two bottle kit, with one bottle the resin and the other a hardener. When equal amounts of resin and hardener are mixed, the compound heats up, then gels and hardens fully.
    Dyes, colors and fillers may be added to the mixture to simulate colors and textures. Dyes should be those designed for use with epoxy resins. Other coloring agents may react with the resin and destroy its normal properties.

    Safe Handling :

    Epoxy resins should be used only in a well ventilated area. You should avoid inhalation of the fumes (fumes are much lighter with epoxy resins than with other chemicals used to simulate liquids), and it is advisable to wear gloves and goggles to protect your eyes against accidental splashes. The product comes with clear instructions for safe handling.
    This is not a product which should be used by children. Keep bottles out of reach of children at all times.
    Rubbing alcohol (or other alcohol) can be used to clean up liquid resin from tools or spills before it sets.

    Mixing:

    The two components must be thoroughly mixed together in containers which are disposable, and which will not react with the materials. Small flexible plastic cups with clearly marked measures work well for miniature applications.
    Epoxy resins need to be carefully measured to exactly equal amounts of resin and hardener. The preferred method is to pour an amount of one into a disposable plastic measuring container, then pour the second compound into a separate container and compare to make sure the amounts are equal.

    Once you have equal amounts, you pour the contents of the first container into the second and use a straight sided stick (craft stick) to mix the hardener and the resin thoroughly. When the compounds are mixed in that container, you pour the mixture back into the container used to measure the first compound, to make sure that the excess which remained in the first container after the first pour to mix, is mixed into the final mixture.

    Removing Bubbles:

    Mixing the resin and the hardener will create bubbles. If you exhale over the mixture, the bubbles will burst due to the carbon dioxide in your breath. If you will be filling small bottles, pots, glasses or pitchers, make sure you leave the epoxy for several minutes to de gas before you pour it into it’s final container.

    Working Conditions:

    Most brands of epoxy resins give you approximately ½ hour of working time before they begin to gel. (This working time depends on the temperature conditions of your work area). Most resins harden in about 8 hours at 70 degrees Fahrenheit. They should not be used about 50% humidity or they may cloud over. The material has a shelf life of at least a year if stored in tightly sealed containers. Items made from epoxy resin will yellow if exposed to sunlight.

    Liquid Effects with Epoxy Resin:

    Epoxy resin settles to a flat shape which pulls slightly away from the edges of containers. If you use it for still water, you will need to apply a final edging to your water to eliminate the edge left as the resin pulled away to the centre of the pour.
    Plan your work carefully. You may need to seal an area first before you pour your resin, and you may need to add in details with each layer (to build a realistic stream with fish for example, or to have tadpoles or fruit slices positioned everywhere in your bowl or jar, not all sunk at the bottom, with liquid on top).

    If you want to simulate melting jellies, ice creams or spilled drinks, allow the epoxy resin to begin to gel before you pour it. This will produce a thicker layer than if it is poured right after mixing. If you want a wet footprint or puddle effect, and you may want to remove this effect from a scene later, pour the resin onto a flexible plastic surface so that you can peel the plastic off and remove the puddle, then place the puddle on the floor of a dollhouse without bonding the resin to the floor.
    Other products are better for the effects of running water, and most can be combined with hardened epoxy resin.

    Tips and Hints:

    • Epoxy resins will not release easily from moulds. Do not use them to make dollhouse jellies or other items which need to be extracted from a mold.
    • Incorrect mixing will result in the epoxy resin not hardening. Measure carefully before you mix!
    • When filling a container with a small opening fill it drop by drop from a pin or toothpick or use a disposable eye dropper or syringe.
    • Avoid working in cold or humid conditions, either may cause the resin to cure cloudy.
    • Use compatible resin dyes to color resin. Compatible dyes come transparent or translucent and colors can be mixed.
    • Some plastic pieces can dissolve in epoxy resins. Check that backings and colors will not be affected by the resin before working with your final project.
    Brands Commonly Available (similar resin, but may differ in package size sold, or in price)
    • Castin Craft - widely available in small packages of hardener and resin for under $10, range of coloring agents and fillers available. Buy Direct
    • Envirotex Lite - widely available via craft stores, hobby shops, boat suppliers, plastics shops. Available in small packages of hardener and resin for under $10.
    • Ultra Glo – similar to Envirotex Lite, different range of distributors.
    • Glaze Coat - similar to Envirotex Lite, usually available from woodworking suppliers.
    • Crystal Sheen – similar to Envirotex Lite, usually available from plastic and casting suppliers.
    • Aristocrat Liquid Glass (note, the term Liquid Glass is also used for car polish brands, the epoxy resin is Aristocrat Liquid Glass) - similar to Envirotex Lite, often available from craft sections of big box stores, or art suppliers.


    Miniatures From Epoxy Resin - Materials and Projects


    More Mini Food Projects Using Epoxy Resins


    Water Effects for Miniature Displays Using Epoxy Resin


    Related Articles
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    Re: Tìm hiểu bột màu, vật liệu, phương pháp... làm đồ chơi giống thật

    Create Miniature and Dolls House Stained Glass Effects

    By Lesley Shepherd, About.com Guide

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    Introduction to Creating Miniature Stained Glass Effects
    Dollhouse Stained Glass Created Using a Printed Transparency
    Lesley Shepherd © 2007

    Stained Glass effects are useful for many types of miniatures. These techniques can be used to color miniature glass and plastic containers, lampshades, plates, and serving trays as well as to create the effects of stained glass windows in miniature for dolls houses or other scale buildings.
    Clear acetate sheets or thin glass work best as a surface. Test your colors on a surface sample first. Some plastics will cause coloring pens or felt pens to bead up. Other colors may destroy the plastic surface you want to use. Check first!
    Stained glass is most realistic if the colors match real samples and the lead lines between the colors follow paths properly. Glass pieces with an inner curve are difficult to cut, lead lines often divide pieces into simpler shapes. Some lead lines are used to emphasize the shapes in the overall picture, others balance the overall picture. Look at photographs of leaded glass similar to the design you want to reproduce to make sure you can copy not only the colors, but the distinctive leading lines.


    Materials to Create Miniature Stained Glass Windows
    Materials for Making Dollhouse Scale Stained Glass Windows
    Lesley Shepherd © 2007
    To create miniature or dolls house stained glass you will need :
    • Transparent ink pens capable of writing on glass or plastic (or you can use craft store glass effect paints) For these projects I used Sakura Glaze Pens
    • Acetate sheets or thin pieces of glass, acrylic or plastic glazing. Some clear report covers from the stationery store work well.
    • A stained glass pattern in the correct size to trace over, or you can use an overhead transparency you print with a laser or ink jet printer to print directly on clear plastic.
    • A black gel glaze pen to create raised black lines to resemble lead lines on stained glass, or thin peel off lines in a silver color, available from scrapbooking suppliers.

    Patterns for Miniature Stained Glass Windows
    Patterns for Simple Dollhouse Stained Glass Windows
    Lesley Shepherd © 2007
    Print this pattern to the scale you wish for your miniature scene or dollhouse and use it as a guide beneath your window or sheet of plastic. Alternatively, print this pattern onto an overhead transparency sheet using an inkjet or laser printer. Check that the transparency sheet is compatible with the type of printer you are using.
    If you prefer, print an alternate design from a book of stained glass patterns or from a website which offers copyright free patterns.
    The detailed window on the introductory page of these instructions was created by printing a Dover books illustration for a William Morris wood cut onto a piece of overhead transparency film using an ink jet printer. In this case, the slight coating on the overhead film did not detract from the final design.
    Choosing Patterns for Miniature Stained Glass
    Simple patterns work best. Patterns with a lot of free flowing lines will require a very steady hand with a pen. If you wish to use silver peel off lines to create lead lines for miniatures, use designs which do not have many curves. If you intend to use a gel pen to create the lead lines, choose a design with lines which are far enough apart that the pen lines will not obscure the glass design. If you choose a traditional stained glass window which has detailing applied to the glass (faces, hands etc.), choose a design with the largest subjects you can find. Very elaborate designs may become too crowded to be effective when reduced to a smaller scale.


    Miniature Windows Printed on Overhead Transparency Film Using an Ink Jet Printer
    Overhead Transparency Printed by an Inkjet to Make Dollhouse Stained Glass Windows
    Lesley Shepherd © 2007
    The photo above shows miniature window designs printed on an overhead transparency using an inkjet printer. Suitable overhead transparency pages can be bought from a stationery or office supply store.
    Some overhead transparency pages have a coating to enable the ink to adhere better. You may need to clean this coating off the non printed side of the transparency before you use markers, glaze pens, or stained glass paint to color your design. Test a corner of the sheet to determine if this is necessary. Many coatings can be removed with alcohol on a cotton swab.
    It may not be possible to completely remove the coating from the overhead sheet to create a completely clear window. If this is the case, your window will have a slight frosted effect which will be appropriate for particular applications.


    Painting on Film to Create Stained Glass for Miniatures or Dolls Houses
    Dollhouse Stained Glass Colored with Glaze Gel Pens
    Lesley Shepherd © 2007
    Basic glass Coloring Techniques
    Tape your film or glass over your miniature printed stained glass window design to hold it perfectly flat. Fill in areas of color using glaze pens, markers or stained glass paints.
    If you are coloring onto a printed overhead sheet, clean the back side of the sheet with soap and water or alcohol (make sure the printed side doesn't get wet or damp or it may run!) Color on the back side of the overhead sheet, the side which is not printed. That way the printed design lines will cover any slight mistakes you make.
    Fill in colored areas which are not adjacent. Allow the color to dry before coloring the area which borders it, otherwise the colors may bleed.
    For deeper colors, apply a second coat of ink or paint to the section after the first coat has dried.
    To Create Marbled Glass - apply a small patch of opaque white glaze to the area you wish to marble, then apply small patches of color and stroke them through the white glaze with a blunt toothpick or pin. Use the toothpick to move the marbled glaze to the edges of the fill area to completely cover it. Allow to dry (opaque white glaze pens seem transparent until they dry)
    To Create Streaky Glass - use two closely related colors to fill the area and allow them to bleed or run together. If you do not have a second closely related color, apply your color to the patch you wish to appear streaky, allow it to dry, then apply a second layer in streaks on top of the first (don't completely fill the area the second time).
    To Create Old Clear Glass- Fill the area with clear glaze and allow to dry. Apply a second coat thinly to the first in a swirl pattern, or streaks (do not completely fill the area with the second coat). When viewed from the front of the window it will appear to have streaks and swirls in the clear finish when dry which will resemble old rolled glass.

    Applying Lead Lines to Miniature Faux Stained Glass
    Dollhouse Stained Glass with Silver Sticker Lines Added to Mimic Leading
    Lesley Shepherd © 2007
    To apply lead lines to miniature faux stained glass, first ensure the object is completely colored, all colors are dry and surfaces are clean. (See previous step)
    Using Peel Off Lines as Lead Lines
    To use peel off lines, carefully pull back on an individual line and remove it from the backing. Place the line on the colored plastic or glass, extending it slightly beyond the area you intend to cover. Use a craft stick or paper embossing tool to press gently down on the line as you lay it in place. Trim off the excess slightly beyond where you will have it end in the final. Apply all lines to your piece, cutting and trimming as necessary. A fine pointed sharp craft knife will help trim the final ends square. If the piece will be fitted into a dollhouse window frame, add a final peel off line as an outline on all outside edges. Leave a border (1/8 to 1/4 inch) along the outside edges of your stained glass piece to allow you to fit it into a window frame.
    Using Embossing/Glaze Pens as Lead Lines
    To create lead lines with an embossing/glaze pen, determine which side is the right side. If you have created texture with glaze pens to create special glass effects you may want to use the uncoated side of your panel as the right or show side. Lay your colored panel on a flat surface and tape it down right side up. Draw a black glaze pen slowly over the surface to create raised black lines in places that would normally be leaded. Remember that tight inside curves are difficult in glass. Pieces are often cut to have simple curves. If you are using a reduced glass pattern for your miniature stained glass, you can follow the actual lead lines given. If you are using an illustration, you will have to determine where the most logical lead lines should go.
    Using Printed Transparencies
    If you use a printed transparency the print outlines will serve as lead.


    Miniature Applications for Faux Stained Glass
    Miniature Faux Stained Glass Windows, Wardian Case and Serving Tray
    Lesley Shepherd © 2007
    Miniature faux stained glass can be used to decorate boxes, create serving trays, and replicate miniature windows for dolls houses or other scale buildings. The same technique can also be used to color miniature pitchers and plates to create the effect of clear plastic, or colored glass.
    Three dimensional objects can also be given the effect of stained glass. The Wardian Case shown here was created as a flat object and folded and glued into shape after the colored glaze was added with glaze pens.
    Create a Glass or Colored Plastic Serving Tray for Miniature Settings
    • Determine the dimensions and shape you would like for your serving tray.
    • Determine where the crease lines will go for a platter, plate or shaped tray.
    • Lay a piece of acetate or plastic over a printed template or illustration.
    • Copy the design using gel glaze pens, markers or stained glass paints.
    • Leave to dry.
    • Fold gently on fold lines or crease to form a rim (plates and platters).
    Create Colored Plastic Dishes

    Use glass paint or glaze pens to coat a plastic plate or dollhouse dish. Set aside to dry. Use as many coats as necessary to create the depth of color you wish. As with the stained glass windows allow each color to dry before coloring adjacent areas.
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    Re: Tìm hiểu bột màu, vật liệu, phương pháp... làm đồ chơi giống thật

    Paint A Traditional Rich Mahogany Finish On Raw Softwood Or Painted Surfaces

    By Lesley Shepherd, About.com Guide

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    Faux Mahogany Finish For Full Size or Miniature Projects
    A faux mahogany finish on a dolls house fireplace set beside a piece of finished fine grain mahogany for comparison.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.

    The techniques in these instructions will take you through the steps to create a realistic faux mahogany finish on unfinished softwood or a painted surface - anything from illustration board to painted metal. Cuban and Honduras mahogany is often used for high quality furniture, and the wood is also used for scale miniature furniture as it has a fine grain which suits several scales without adjustment.
    It helps to have a reference piece of mahogany to match. If you are trying to match commercial frames or faux mahogany finishes on modern full scale or miniature furniture, you may need to modify the process. Most modern faux mahogany finishes from Asia are a much brighter red than true mahogany, and often show little graining. If you need to match these finishes, adjust the final glaze coats to the color of your furniture.


    Materials Used to Create a Faux Mahogany Finish on Unfinished Wood or Painted Su
    Finished piece of softwood with a faux mahogany finish, shown next to unfinished wood, and compared to the overly red finish of a commercial dolls house chair.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To Create a Faux Mahogany Finish You Will Need:
    • Prepared Piece to Finish - a raw wood or painted finish should be sanded with 120 or finer grit sandpaper then thoroughly cleaned to remove all sanding grit using a tackcloth or damp rag. If you are starting with a painted piece, apply a pale apricot undercoat, then use a brush and some mid orange/yellow paint to add jagged grain lines to the painted piece similar to those you find on unfinished softwood. Remember to always sand along the length of the grain, never sand across the grain lines, real or imaginary!.
    • Clear Acrylic Glaze It is easiest to use a glaze made from your finishing coat, so use gloss if you want a gloss finish, or semi gloss if you want a flatter finish. Acrylic glaze is used so you can tint it yourself. If you are finishing large pieces of regular furniture, you can use acrylic 'clearcoat' or a water based Diamond Varathane (do not confuse water based varathane with oil based varathane). If you are trying to match an existing finish for repairs, check to see what type of coating is on your piece, before you use glaze coats. You may have to adjust your choice of materials to blend with existing finishes (traditional shellac, french polish or other coats).
    • Acrylic Paints Tube paints work better than liquid craft acrylics as they are more concentrated, but you can use either type. For my sample I used a flat black, a deep brick red (sometimes called rosewood in craft paints - slightly blue rather than orange) a cadmium (bright) orange, and raw or burnt umber (either works) Depending on the color you want to match you may also need a bluish red and a deep brown.
    • Fine Paint Brushes The size will depend on what size and scale your project is. I use a stiff student art brush for the dry brushed sections of my miniature wood, or a stiff small paint brush for full scale pieces. To apply the orange glaze coat vein lines I use a rounded watercolor brush in an appropriate size (form minaitures) or a large rounded paint brush for full size projects. For overwashed glaze coats I use a soft broad square tipped water color brush for miniatures or a soft bristled standard paint brush for full scale pieces.
    • Fine Sand Paper To sand between coats and keep the grain from raising, I use 120 to 320 grit for miniature pieces
    • Tack Cloth to remove sanded paint and grit after sanding.
    • Fine Beeswax Furniture Polish To put a final realistic glow on the miniature pieces, or to match the finish on larger pieces.

    Dry Brush Fine Pores for Faux Mahogany
    The first step in creating a faux mahogany finish is to use a dry brush technique and black or dark brown paint to mimic fine dotted pore markings.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Real mahogany has fine dark flecks as well as grain lines. To make these for your faux finish, use flat black acrylic paint, and a dry brush technique to create tiny dots and slightly dragged lines on your raw wood or painted undercoat. You don't need a lot, but you do need to make the dots fairly tiny and not clump them.
    Using a dry brush technique with most of the paint removed, touch your brush straight down and bounce it lightly (pouncing) to produce the tiny dots. If your paint coat is too thick, dab it off without wiping it into the wood or paint finish, or sand the excess off when the paint is dry and try again.

    Dry Brush Some Fine Red/Brown Grain Lines
    A dry brush technique is used to draw faint grain lines with deep brick or barn red paint to create grain lines for a faux mahogany finish.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Mix up a bit of brick red or rosewood (deep blue/brown red) acrylic paint (add water to make it a good consistency to brush out thinly if you are using tube paints) and use the dry brush technique to feather some small red grain lines in your faux mahogany. For miniature projects make these lines fairly fine, for larger projects you can make them slightly larger.
    The sample on the bottom in the photo above shows some splotches where the brush added too much paint. You can usually sand these splotches out when the paint is dry to break them up and make them blend into your faux finish.
    For this dry brushing section you want to press the brush gently onto the surface of the piece and draw it gently along to create lines as shown above. The lines should have a slight curve or a wiggle to them and not be perfectly straight.
    Lightly sand your piece when the red/brown lines are dry to break them up a bit. Check the edges of your piece to make sure some of your lines go right to the edge. Sand off any excess paint that sticks to the edge if you are painting on more than one side of a piece.


    Add Orange Glazed Grain Lines To Your Faux Mahogany Finish
    Cadmium orange paint mixed with clear glaze is used to create orange grain lines for a faux mahogany finish on softwood or a painted surface.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    The next step in a realistic faux mahogany finish is to create orange grain lines which will remain as you complete the finish. For this step mix some cadmium orange acrylic paint into some of your clear glaze or clearcoat to make a light orange glaze that will allow a lot of the original color of the wood to show through (see the sample above to judge how transparent your glaze needs to be). If you are working with a piece that started as painted apricot base coat instead of raw wood, you will need to add a few more lines to mimic the type of grain that unfinished softwood has. You can mix a slightly stronger orange glaze and brush on some wavy lines in the direction you want the grain (usually lengthwise) allow this to dry, then add some more glaze to your paint and add the light orange glaze lines.
    If you are working with unfinished softwood, use your thin orange glaze to lay down some slightly wavy lines about the same size as your existing wood grain lines are. This glaze coat will seal the wood or painted surface beneath it and keep some light areas in your finished faux mahogany surface.
    Sand this coat very lightly when it is dry before adding the over glaze coats.


    Mix and Apply a Red Brown Overglaze For a Faux Mahogany Finish
    A first coat of red brown glaze applied over the graining for a piece of faux finish mahogany. The smaller sample shows the glaze alone over wood with no added graining.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Take some of the same or similar brick or rosewood red you used for the fine red grain lines, and add clear glaze to it, along with a small amount of raw or burnt umber acrylic paint, to make a reddish brown overglaze. This coat needs to be fairly transparent. In the photo above you can see how transparent it is on the sample of raw wood which has only the overglaze coat applied to it.
    Brush this coat completely over your pieces, trying to avoid any build up or drips on straight edges.
    Set the piece aside to dry, then sand it, sanding it out unevenly to create several colors on your piece. Use a tack cloth to remove any sanded bits of paint before you proceed to the next step.


    Add A Second Darker Coat of Overglaze to Your Faux Mahogany Finish
    A second coat of red brown glaze is applied over the previous coat for a faux mahogany finish on softwood.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Check your finish so far against anything you want to match, or a sample of finished mahogany. Add a bit more red and brown to your glaze coat from the previous step, or adjust it by adding some orange if your piece needs more orange to match an existing sample or finish. Apply this coat over your piece making sure all areas are finished evenly. With any luck this will be your final coat!
    After I applied a second coat of darkened glaze, my mahogany still needed more brown and orange, so I applied a final coat of brown and orange mixed into my basic red glaze to create the finished coat you see in the final sample on the next page.
    When the piece is dry, check the color against your sample or existing finish. If it matches, sand the dry finish lightly with fine sandpaper, and use a tack cloth to wipe off any sanded residue.
    If it doesn't match, sand it (heavily or lightly , whichever you need!) and adjust your glaze coat to be more orange, or more red, or more brown so that it more closely resembles your sample or finished piece.


    Adjust the Finish On Your Faux Mahogany
    The mantelpiece of a dolls house fireplace finished as mahogany with a faux mahogany painting process useful for miniature or full size finishes.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    When your Faux Mahogany finish is painted to your liking, you can add to its realism by matching the sheen of antique or modern pieces.
    For an Antique Furniture Finish Use fine sandpaper (320 grit or finer) or a set of micro mesh sanding pads to sand your final painted glaze coat smooth. If you use sanding pads, you can get the finish to the degree of gloss you need by working through successively finer pads. If your piece is too complex to sand to a high finish, sand the final coat lightly, then apply a fine beeswax based furniture polish allow it to set up, then polish with a soft cloth to get the degree of gloss finish you want. If you need very high gloss finishes, use liquid 'ice wax' type car polishes, or a thin layer of future floor polish to give you a thin gloss shine. On full size pieces you can use a final gloss coating of clear acrylic finish if necessary. For miniatures, you can get a more realistic scale effect using fine wax to make a thinner gloss coat.
    This is an easy method of finishing inexpensive softwood to resemble quality mahogany. With a bit of practise, anyone can create a far deeper and richer faux mahogany finish than most modern 'mahogany' furniture is given, whether it be on a picture frame, a piece of commerical dolls house furniture made from unknown wood, or an inexpensive piece of assemble it yourself full size furniture.
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    Simple Techniques To Paint Realistic Granite Finishes In a Variety of Scales

    Big box store dolls house wooden counter with a painted faux granite top using techniques from a miniature tutorial on miniatures.about.com
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Paint faux granite finishes for a range of colors and scales using simple paint techniques with basic paint materials and techniques. The sample shown here is in 1:12 scale for a dolls house sideboard, made from a piece of inexpensive big box store dollhouse furniture, but the same simple painted finish can be used on full scale counters, furniture, or decorative items (bookend or lamp bases for example) where you want the appearance of granite but not the cost. You can mimic anything from the basic black and white flecked granites, to the highly figured 'granite' from South American and Europe used for counters and floors.
    To make the finish here I used acrylic paints, and tube watercolor paints as tints for acrylic glazes. You can also use oil or enamel paints if you wish, but the process will take much longer as the paint must dry thoroughly between coats. You will need paints in the colors of the granite you choose to imitate. A wide range of granite patterns can be found online at Granite Photos.com or several other websites. These photos are a good guide to the characteristic colors and patterns found in standard granite types. Before you start, decide whether you want your granite finish to resemble polished, satin, or honed granite. Polished granite has a highly reflective surface (like the sample above) Satin finish granite has a slightly reflective surface, and honed granite is a flat, matte finish.
    As with any faux finish technique, you will become better with practise. You can start on a scrap piece of craft wood, or with a sheet of smooth card. The card can always be cut into tiles for scale miniature projects if you wish. As you work on your sample granite finish, consider the shapes, lines and crystal patterns you see in the stone you want to mimic. You will achieve a more realistic result by using several layers of paint as discussed in this tutorial than you will if you try to mimic a granite stone with only one or two layers.
    Faux stone finishes, including granite, have been used for a very long time. Many pieces of antique furniture have highly figured painted granites and marbles painted over less expensive stone tops. This is a technique that can be used over and over when building scale miniatures, or creating decorative pieces for your home.


    Start Painting the Base Coat and Pattern for Your Particular Faux Granite
    Deep chocolate and white acrylic paints on a dolls house counter top are the first steps in the faux granite paint technique.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Choose the Main Paint Color For Your Faux Granite Surface
    Check reference photos or pieces of actual stone to determine the main colors and crystals or mineral flecks that make your particular granite. Look for colors which run through the entire sample. It is best to use colors which show as thin veins or lines as the base coat. This allows you to build up or 'float' blocks of other color on top of the base, leaving thin sections visible. Any flecks or specks of shiny mica in the granite can be created with finishes above the base layers.
    Paint Colors I Used
    Brushes - I used a soft flat watercolor brush to apply flat coats and glaze layers, a round wooden toothpick and a pin to apply grain lines, a toothbrush to apply flecks and stippling, a cotton bud to apply iridescent medium and mica pigments mixed with glaze. You could also use a fine grained sea sponge to apply dabs of iridescent medium.
    My granite counter in 1:12 scale is based on a deep brown granite with red/brown and small amounts of black and cream. To make it I start with a simple base coat of deep chocolate brown acrylic paint, applied as smoothly as possible to a piece of wood which has been sanded lightly to remove any marks.
    When the base coat is dry, I used a toothpick with a tiny amount of white paint on it and rolled it lightly over the brown base coat to set some light areas into the base of my granite layers. If you need very delicate lines, you can also brush them in place with a fine brush, or draw a brush or feather through thin lines of acrylic laid on the base coat. It really doesn't matter what these lines look like as they will be covered by successive layers of glaze before the faux granite is completed. You just need to add some of the colors found in your granite into the base coat to start the pattern.


    Use Paint and Glazes to Create Depth in Faux Granit Coatings
    A first layer of ground color glaze and some thin blotches of iridescent paint are applied to the base color to begin building up a faux granite finish.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Once you have your basic undercoat started for your painted faux granite finish, you can add the illusion of depth to sections of your faux granite by using glazes. You make a glaze by adding a bit of pigment or paint to a clear finish, either gloss or satin depending on the final finish you want your faux granite to have. (For honed finish granites use a satin or matte finish). Glazes allow you to layer the color effects in your stone and make your painted finish seem like a much thicker stone pattern. Glazes made with iridescent paints or mica pigments can create the effect of crystal layers in granite. For my miniature granite I used a glaze of a mustard yellow or 'gamboge' color across some areas of my base coat. I also applied a thin glaze of to add the shine effect of small irregular crystals along some edges of the white undercoat layer. (see photo above). You can also add thin washes or sponged on dabs of of Jacquard Pearl Ex Pigments to add colored mica specs to your granite layers. If working on a full scale finish, a section of sea sponge is the best way to add irregular paint flecks.
    You will be gradually building up your granite finish so experiment with one or two colored glazes in irregular sections of your faux granite surface. Don't apply these glazes everywhere, only in areas where you want to build up bits of a color.


    Creating The Color Shifts of Crystaline Structure for a Painted Faux Granite
    Thin layers of iridescent paint are sprayed or dabbed on to underlying glaze coats to build up the effect of quartz crystals and mineral flecks in a painted faux granite finish.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Many granites have distinctive quartz crystal structures. You can mimic this effect in your painted faux granite finish by careful applications of thin layers of the same glaze, or by using iridescent paints, which create a slight color shift.
    To Mimic Large Irregular 'Plates' of Quartz - apply irregular dabs of a thin white glaze to your painted surface. After this coat has dried, apply a second layer of irregular dabs in places overlapping the first coat slightly to give layers of color which have varied transparency. If you need your glaze coat to spread out into irregular patterns, you can place a few drops of water or alcohol on your painted surface, and apply a little bit of glaze to the wet areas. Your glaze will spread out and collect at the edges of the damp areas.
    To Mimic Smaller Crystalline Areas - apply irregular flecks of white by using a small fine sea sponge or a stiff brush. Dip the sponge or brush lightly in your paint and remove most of the paint from the sponge onto a paper towel, before you dab it gently onto your painted surface.
    Apply Iridescent Paint Areas - to create the effect of tiny crystals, you can apply dabs of iridescent or pearlized mediums, using a fine brush. The tiny white crystal areas in the photo are thin layers of Windsor and Newton Iridescent Watercolor Medium applied above the first glaze layer. Alternatively, you can mix small amounts of mica pigments into thin transparent glaze, and spray or 'fleck' it onto the surface using a fine spray bottle, or a stiff brush, whose bristles you pull back with your thumb, then let fly to apply the paint. The blue green layers in the photo above are mica pigment in a transparent paint, lightly sprayed onto the surface and allowed to float to the edges of the thin glaze.
    When making your first attempts at a faux granite surface, experiment with adding paint to spots of water applied to the surface, try adding a thin layer of glaze, then breaking it up with a light spray of water from a bottle. Learn which paints 'float' and how sprays of water (or air) can change the look of paint layers.


    Add Fine Spots And Lines of Darker Colors to a Painted Faux Granite Finish
    To build up the effect of various layers and crystals, small amounts of darker and lighter tones are stippled over the first glaze layer. Here the stipple effect is applied in miniature using a stiff tooth brush.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    You are probably worried by now that your painted surface will never resemble granite. You will have a base coat, and at least one or two glaze layers that give your surface depth, but don't help much to recreate the effect of your chosen granite. The next step is to add stippled layers of color to mimic the patterns of the stone.
    Stippling is a technique where you add small points of color by using a 'pouncing' motion of a fairly stiff brush (a toothbrush or stencil brush work well) making sure that the brush has very little paint on it. First pick up some paint on your toothbrush or stencil brush, then take most of it off the ends of the brush by bouncing the brush on a dry paper towel. When most of the paint has been removed, bounce (pounce) your brush lightly straight up and down on areas of your granite where you want small flecks of color. You can use this technique to cover or blend 'mistakes' you have made in previous layers, or just adjust the colors until they more closely resemble your chosen sample. If you want a few streaky lines, you can drag the stiff brush across the surface with it's thin layer of paint to create streaks.
    Use this technique to soften lines or break up glaze lines from previous layers, or to balance areas of your granite surface so that the colors look more like your sample. Make sure you still allow some areas of your transparent glazes or crystal washes to show through.


    Build Stain Layers with Glazes on a Painted Faux Granite Finish
    Semi transparent color mixed with a glaze is brushed or wiped over underlying layers to set the main tones for painted faux granite.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Granites often have areas where the stone appears to be stained with strong colors. To create this effect on your painted faux granite, add another layer of a transparent glaze over the layers of color you have already added. Once again, this transparent wash of pigment (paint) mixed with a clear coat doesn't need to be applied over the entire surface. Apply it only where you want the stain effect to become part of your pattern.


    Add Dark or Light Flecks to Your Painted Faux Granite Finish
    A toothbrush with a thin layer of dark acrylic paint is used to create tiny paint flecks in a miniature faux granite painted finish.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    As you get close to a finished painted faux granite, it is time to add any paint flecks to mimic the granulations or mica flecks you see in the sample you are trying to mimic. The easiest way to apply tiny paint flecks is to dip a paint brush in a fairly liquid paint, then gently pull back on the bristles to flick the paint onto your faux granite surface. Do this inside a cardboard box or other empty container if you are working on a miniature to prevent the flecks from discoloring your work surface or other projects. If sections of your miniature must remain unpainted, mask them off or drape them with a paper towel before flicking paint towards the piece. It is a good idea to test your brush, and the consistency of your paint, on the walls of your box before you try to flick the paint onto your faux granite surface. You may need to thin your paint, or use the brush closer or further away from your surface in order to get the tiny paint flecks you want.
    When you have the right amount of paint flecks, allow the paint to dry thoroughly, then sand your faux granite surface slightly (using a sanding block) to flatten the tiny bumps created by the paint flecks. Don't try to sand the entire surface flat or you will remove a lot of your details. When you have the surface sanded, proceed to applying a final finish.


    Applying a Final Finish To Your Faux Granite
    An enlarged view of roughly one square inch of a faux granite painted finish on a dolls house countertop.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    When your faux granite has all the flecks, steaks and colors that you want to see, it is time to apply the top coats to finish and protect it. You will likely need to apply several thin layers of acrylic varnish as a top coat, taking care to allow the top coats to dry thoroughly, then sanding them lightly with 220 to 240 grit sandpaper on a sanding block , wiping the surface with a tack cloth to remove dust, and reapplying another layer of top coat. You must build the top coats up gradually to fill in any differences between the paint layers.
    For the top coats on my dolls house counter top, I used an artists gloss acrylic varnish, and applied and sanded four coats of finish before the top coat was level. If you prefer a satin finish, use a satin or semi matte varnish. Use a sanding block when sanding down the top coats, and take care not to sand the edges of your piece or you may end up with lines of the base coat visible on the edge. If necessary, you can re-apply glaze or fleck layers between top coats to add detail, but this will create uneven coats which will require more finish layers to level.
    To create a 'honed' finish, dull your final coat of finish slightly by rubbing it gently with a small amount of toothpaste or rottenstone powder on a rag. For a final gloss finish, sand the final coat lightly, then apply a layer of regular furniture wax.
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    Glues for Miniatures and Models - What to Use and When

    By Lesley Shepherd, About.com Guide

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    I'm often asked about particular glues for miniatures, dolls houses and models so I've tried quite a few! For most purposes I suggest people use PVA or white glues whenever possible as they are easy to clean up, don't give off fumes, and will hold most porous materials, as well as holding some non porous materials to porous materials.
    For miniatures and wood structures that might get damp, PVA glues aren't as effective as urethane glues, but these foam and expand in moisture (which is required to set them) need to be applied to both surfaces to work and pieces must be clamped together. These are also much more difficult to clean up than pva glues, as they usually need lacquer thinner or some other strong solvent. For gluing plastic to plastic, Plastic Welding glues which partially dissolve the plastics give the best bond. Like Cyanoacrylate glues (Crazy Glues) they can damage the surface they are applied to, so test first and only use in well ventilated conditions.

    1. PVA or Poly Vinyl Acetate Glues - White or Yellow Glues

    PVA glues are the standby of my workbench. Non toxic and with low fumes they clean up with water. I have several different formulations and use them according to materials. My first choice is always an acid neutral glue. Other than that I occasionally use 'tacky' glue formulations to hold materials on an upright surface, or thick PVA glues which will hold metals or plastics against porous materials like wood paper or leather. I also use PVA wood glues or carpentry glue for interior and exterior uses. I save the yellow glues for exterior use where moisture won't be a problem. Various Types of PVA Glue:

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    2. Polyurethane Glues - Glues That Expand and Foam

    Polyurethane glues like the popular Excel and Gorilla Glue form bonds which in some applications are stronger than PVA glues or Cyanoacrylate glues. These are highly water resistant glues good for exterior applications and will bond wood, as well as non porous materials like stone, ceramics, metals and some plastics. Polyurethane glues foam and swell up as they cure. These glues do not clean up with water, so have denatured alchohol handy to clean up your joints before the glue sets. Most solvents are inactive on polyurethane glue, so don't ever plan on removing them without sanding once they have bonded.

    3. Cyanoacrylate Glues

    Cyanoacrylate glues, also known as Crazy glues or Super glues have some special uses for miniatures. They are fast setting, but generally brittle glues, except for particular formulations. They can be used to help hold materials while other slower bonding glues set up, but are rarely advisable for use on their own with most miniatures. Be careful when using them to work only in well ventilated areas, with eye protection. You can develop sensitivities to them. Gloves are also advisable.

    4. Epoxy Glues and Pastes

    Two part epoxy glues, putties and pastes are useful for bonding metals and ceramics, although they can also be used with wood, glass, stone and some plastics. Permanent when set, they are available in a range of thicknesses, partially detemined by the gap size they are expected to fill. Epoxies have the advantage of being very stable when cured, as they are resistant to heat and to chemicals. Most epoxies will deteriorate with exposure to UV light.
    There are a wide range of slight differences between brands of epoxy glues, putties and pastes, based on the type of resin and hardener (activator) used. The various types and brands differ mainly by cure time, color, the ability to withstand heat, flexibility when cured, and consistency. Choose a brand which will work for the widest number of applications you will need epoxy for. Most have a short shelf life after opening. Be sure to follow safety guidelines when using all forms of epoxy. Allergic reactions to the hardener can develop.
    Kneadable epoxy putties are often used to repair large cracks, or fill areas on models for repurposing a model. They are used by model horse enthusiasts to reshape horses, and by gamining miniature enthusiasts as a modelling material for new sculpts. Retooling and sanding work differently on various brands, so experiment with a few if you intend to use them for sculpting or re-sculpting models and figures. Some thinner two part epoxy pastes such as Apoxie Paste can be used for making casts in simple moulds, as well as for bonding and filling larger cracks in broken ceramics and other materials.

    5. Plastic Glues and Plastic Weld Glues

    A number of glues will work with plastic, but there are special plastic welding cements that dissolve the plastic to create a stronger bond. Plastic glues don't work with all plastics so you need to know what types of plastic you are trying to bond together and use the apppropriate glue. If acetone (nail polish remover) causes the surfac of a scrap of similar plastic to become tacky, you can usually use that plastic with a plastic cement or plastic weld.
    6. Silicone Glues / Adhesives and Caulks

    Silicone caulk and glues are used by modellers for a range of very different purposes. They are often used to simulate flowing water in railroad terrains. Silicone is also used to hold vibrating motors in place in model airplanes and boats, and is used to glue glass and metal to a range of other surfaces. One of the confusions with silicone is that very similar types are available for a range of 'specialized' applications. If you need small amounts, try pet stores where it is sold to repair aquariums, or dive stores, where it is sold to seal masks. Scrapbook stores sell small tubes of clear silicone 'glue' to hold beads, glass and metal securely to metallic papers and cards. Automotive stores sell small tubes of gasket material, or window sealant, which are all the same basic silicone.
    If you need to paint silicone for any reason, make sure you buy a 'paintable' silicone to start with, usually found at a hardware store.
    As many silicones give off acetic acid as they cure, try to use 'oxime' cure silicones where you are working with materials that need to be acid free. Why You Should Use Acid Free Materials

    7. Microcrystalline Waxes or Gels

    Crystalline waxes and wax gels are sold under a variety of names for temporarily holding items to smooth surfaces. Sometimes called 'museum wax', 'tacky wax' or 'quake wax' , these are good for positioning miniatures as parts of models or scenes. Model horse artisans use them to hold bits on model horses, collectors use them to hold items on display shelves, and miniaturists of all types use them to fix items into the hands of figures. These waxes are available in gel or wax formulations. The gels are usually clearer, and are useful for adhering clear glass objects to clear shelving. They are of limited use in displays which will get hot enough to soften the wax.

    More on Materials for Miniatures

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    Building Materials for Scale Models and Dolls Houses

    By Lesley Shepherd, About.com Guide

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    Learn which materials are used to build dolls' houses and scale buildings. The materials you use may influence your choice of building components like windows and doors, or determine how you should best finish your house. Each type of materials ans pros and cons. Before you start construction of a model building, read about these materials to familiarize yourself with the tools, techniques, and characteristics of the various building materials.
    Baltic Birch Vs Medium Density Fiberboard

    Photo ©2007 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Dolls houses and other miniature scale buildings often come as kits or completed structures made from MDF (medium density fiberboard) or Baltic Birch plywood. There are pros and cons to each material which are discussed here. Both materials give off some gasses, so they should never be left unfinished. Plywood structures are lighter and can be built to be dismantled or added on to at a later date. The decision of which to use is personal, but this article gives you some of the pros and cons of each material. If you use MDF, make sure you prime it before you paint. How to Prime MdfMore Info


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    Gatorfoam / Gator Board

    Photo ©2007 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    This material is used mostly for indoor and outdoor display support for photo's and posters. It makes a great building material for miniaturist's, but it isn't the same as the more commonly available foam core board. You are best using fine tooth power tools to cut it, but it's light weight, ease of building and smooth, water resistant surface, makes it ideal for many miniature applications. This material does give off gases, so it may not be accepted by museums. It is most often used as a substrate for displays which use paperclay or other modelling materials to create special surface techniques, or where light but sturdy materials are required.
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    Luan/Lauan Plywood

    Luan/Lauan Plywood is often the material used for less expensive dollhouse kits. It is an easily worked material, but requires more finishing work than some other choices. In kits this plywood is often die cut and assembled using tab and slot construction methods rather than nails or screws. Buildings made with thin luan will need to use doors and windows designed to fit in this material. It is also more difficult to set up round wire routes through laun, as floors and walls may be too thin to score for wiring channels.
    More Info

    Basswood or Tilia (Lime) Stripwood or Scale Lumber

    Craft stripwood and scale lumber is available from a range of suppliers. Most of the stripwood is basswood or Tilia (lime) wood, both used for their fine grain and strength. Some specialist hardwood stripwood is also available from specialist suppliers, mainly in sizes for model ships, although some is in various scales for dollhouse miniatures as well. Stripwood is good for building component parts for buildings (windows and doors), scale furniture or trims for dolls houses and roomboxes. Instructions for building windows and doors can be found here:
    Bookboard/Paperboard

    Photo ©2008 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Bookboard , Davey board or paper board is an inexpensive, acid neutral, dense paper based board used for strong boxes and book covers. It is often used to construct roomboxes and breakaway boxes for dolls house displays and is also a choice material for architectural models. It can also be used as a base for printable miniature buildings. Bookboard is available from scrapbook and art suppliers or book repair specialists.More Info


    Sheet Styrene

    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Sheet styrene can be bend and shaped as well as glued to make buildings and other models. It is most often used to scratchbuild railroad model buildings and rolling stock, but has many other uses as well.More InfoRead Review


    Creative PaperClay

    Photo ©2007 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Creative Paperclay® is a useful medium for creating miniature plaster, stucco, pargetting, stone tiles, tiled floors and walls, landscaping rock and stone effects, or small three dimensional miniatures or sculptures. With handling properties very similar to fine clay, this is a safe, easy way to create strong lightweight miniatures which need no curing, other than a protective coat of sealant.
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    Wood Aging Effects

    Photo ©2007 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    This simple technique will turn new wood into aged silvered, brown or blackened wood within minutes of application. This is a great way to make repairs to items which have naturally weathered or to create the look of weathered boards or shingles on miniature buildings.
    More Info


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    Wood Shingles

    Photo ©2007 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Wood Shingle effects can be created in many scales using wood, wood veneers, paper tags or paper strips. The shingles can be shaped to particular patterns for siding, or used to create rustic or aged roofs.
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    Miniature Building Projects

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    Powered by Translate Saturday, February 12, 2011

    Tutorial: How to Etch Bricks

    Though there are many ways to simulate brick on a dollhouse --beautifully printed papers, embossed wood or latex veneers, intricate stencils, and many other methods-- perhaps the most realistic way is by etching individual scale bricks into paint. Nothing can quite compare to a "brick" surface finished in this manner. It is a cost-effective, but highly time-consuming, labor-intensive process. It is the method favored by the dollhouse deities, Mulvany and Rogers. And if it's good enough for them, well then certainly it's good enough for Merriman Park!
    (The dollhouse Holy Bible)!

    Deborah Knight of my dollhouse miniatures chat group asked how I do it and I thought, "How funny, didn't I already explain the process in my blog?" Guess I'm spending too much time blabbing on and on about Dark Shadows, and not enough about the nuts and bolts about Merriman Park.


    How to Do It:
    Step One: With any project, surface preparation is key. Seal your surface with a quality primer. I used to be on the enamel-primer-only team, but recent improvements to latex primers have brought me around. (Cleaning up with soap and water, as opposed to chemical solvents was a big factor in my change of heart).

    Step Two: Two coats of gesso make up your mortar base. Be sure to tint your gesso with acrylic paints --the au natural gesso is a bit too bright for most projects. I used a drop or two of burnt sienna for Merriman Park.

    Step Three: On top of the gesso, apply two coats of your brick base color. Bricks come in many colors and I mixed mine from artist's acrylic paints, but any latex paint will do. Keep in mind that your finished bricks will look considerably lighter once the bricks are etched into your base coat. Let base coat dry for at least twenty-four hours.

    Step Four: With a ruler, mark the horizontal mortar joints. I used 3/16th" for Merriman Park.

    Step Five: Using a small woodworker's gouge, etch the horizontal mortar lines. I found it helpful to go up two or three inches at a time. That is, mark your lines for two or three inches and then go ahead and etch them in. Continue marking and etching. If your lines are off by even a little, it will show. You can always paint out any mistakes and do over, but that is such a drag! The gouge will leave miniature curlicues of acrylic paint all over the place, so be warned! Use a small, stiff paintbrush to keep them at bay.
    (One of the first brick mock-ups for Merriman Park. Always experiment on a piece of scrap before tackling your project)!

    Step Six: Mark your vertical lines. This creates the "individual bricks" so take your time and be accurate. Merriman Park is an eighteenth-century house so they would have used the flemish bond, which is what I reproduced.
    (Photographs do not show the detailed, 3-D effect that etched grout lines produce).

    Step Seven: Have a cocktail, rest your eyes and appreciate your work! (Most important step).

    I haven't done Step Eight, yet, which is to go back and highlight individual bricks in a random pattern. I'm working on bricking the chimneys right now. (Chimneys with pots, I might add, thanks to Karin Corbin!

    Woman of short-lived passions

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    Re: Tìm hiểu bột màu, vật liệu, phương pháp... làm đồ chơi giống thật

    How to Make a Scale River, Lake, Harbor, or Just about any other body of Water

    January 21, 2009

    by Author of Interacting with Miniature Railroading

    Now that we’ve covered size, shape and color theory of these necessary waterways, let’s move onto the modeling portion of this tutorial.
    Our Main Ingredients are the following:
    The “WATER”
    For water, Woodland Scenics has been selling a horrendously overpriced product called “Realistic Water” which is actually just Acryllic Glazing Liquid used for painting light layers of paint on a painting. Learn more about Acrylic glazing liquid here. You can get this stuff by the GALLON for half the price of the bottle of WS product at Blick Art Supply.
    This stuff is smelly, but not noxious. I would suggest opening a window if you want to model while you pour this stuff. It takes about 24 hours to dry and ONLY pour in 1/16″ depths. In all honesty, you really don’t need to pour this stuff deep, it looks fine on the surface.
    Paint
    Using color samples directly taken from the river via the satelite photos I posted in my previous article, I came up with this list of “necessary colors”
    You can explore the ‘zillions’ of other colors out there; here.

    The Colors I used to paint the River are mostly from Benjamin Moore’s “Color Sample” paint jars. These 3oz Jars cost about $3-4 and cover a 2X2 foot area if used completely. Yu can get these at a well-stocked hardware store, or a Home Improvement warehouse.
    The other colors in the 2oz containers are the $1 craft paints you can get from any craft store.

    The Colors Are:
    -Dark Green: “Mohegan Sage” (Ben #2138-30)
    -Tan: “Monroe Bisque” (Ben# HC-26)
    -Sky Blue: “Yarmouth Blue” (Ben#HC-150)
    -Dark Brown: “Clinton Brown” (Ben#HC-72)
    Craft Paint:
    -Navy Blue
    -Sand Stone
    Optional Regional colors:
    for Clay rivers, use “Terra Cotta”
    for black use “Asphaltum” (which is a very dark brown. Avoid black at ALL COSTS)
    Prepping the Riverbed, Lakebed, or Harbor.
    You can approach this two ways:

    1. Involves laying down a flat piece of particle board, adding the riverbanks in, then painting the surface and adding the acryllic glaze, then finally adding ripples with acrylic gloss medium. This is good for wide, deep rivers, harbors, lakes and channels.

    2. For creeks and shallow or seasonal rivers that vary wildly in depth year-round, or a river that has a lot of sandbars or islands, try this method: (READ MORE) <-Will be written about tomorrow
    Painting Technique:

    Gently blend your sand color and your brown colors the farther from shore you get, then blend the brown into the green, and finally add navy blue in the center if this is a deep river. (See the color chart above)
    Let this dry overnight to see if the colors you blended looks satisfactory. Make sure that all blends between colors are SEAMLESS, and don’t have a distinct break in color, unless you’re modeling underwater vegetation like Algae in the deep log pond (above) or brown coastal seaweed.

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    Woman of short-lived passions

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