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    List of Miniature Food Projects for Dollhouse and Scale Miniature Scenes

    By Lesley Shepherd, About.com Guide

    See More About:

    This list of free tutorials for making dolls' house miniature food and play scale foods or re-ment scale foods covers everything from main courses to desserts and snacks. Not all the projects are made with polymer clay. Some use air dry clay, florist's foam or other materials. The tutorials are all clearly explained with photos to make them easy for beginners.
    1. Make Everyday Foods in Miniature, Dollhouse and Play Scales

    Lesley Shepherd
    Comfort foods and everyday dishes are a staple for dolls' house miniaturists and re-ment or play scale kitchens. Here are a range of techniques used to make them.
    Make Miniature Pancakes and Waffles - polymer or air dry clay
    Make Miniature Muffins - polymer or air dry clay
    Make Miniature Cookies - polymer or air dry clay
    Make a Miniature Lemon Meringue Pie - polymer or air dry clay
    Make Scale Bread, Toast and Toppings - polymer or air dry clay
    Make Wobbly Jellies - meltable resin, such as Scenic Water


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    2. Make Miniature Cookies

    Photo © 2011 Lesley Shepherd
    Scale miniature cookies can be made in a range of designs that mimic home made and commercial baking. Try some of the methods below to extend you range of miniature accessories for parlor, kitchen or shop scenes.


    3. Make Miniature Foods for Special Holidays and Celebrations

    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    You can make a wide range of scale miniature foods for displays for special celebrations. Here you'll find everything from birthday and Mother's day cakes, to Haggis for Burns Suppers and Sugar Skulls For Day of the Dead Offrendas.


    4. Make Doll Scale Fruits and Vegetables

    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    These projects introduce you to a range of simple techniques for making highly realistic fruits and vegetables in miniature scales.


    5. Make A Range of Miniature Chocolates and Candies

    Photo Copyright 2011 Lesley Shepherd
    Miniature chocolates and candies can be used for a range of miniature dollhouse shops and special scenes.


    6. Make Dollhouse Baking and Pantry Supples

    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    You can make dolls' house scalefood packaging from printables, and you can make very realistic spills and and items like raw eggs from standard art supplies.


    7. Make Miniature Junk Food and Fair Foods

    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Of course miniature scenes need junk food or fair food for special scenes. These tutorials have everything from ice cream cones to popcorn,, bread, chips, french fries, cotton candy and mini donuts.


    8. Special Techniques For Molding Miniature Food Shapes Over and Over

    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Silicone moulds make it easy to make some miniature foods over and over in endless variations. Here are some special uses for two part silicone mold putty



    More on Modelling with Polymer and Air Dry Clays


    Reviews of Books On Making Miniature Foods in Several Scales


    More Miniature Projects


    Related Articles



    Introduction to Making 1:12 Scale Dolls House Waffles
    1:12 Scale Dolls House Waffles
    Lesley Shepherd
    Dolls house waffles are easily made from polymer clay using a dolls house waffle press or a stamp made from polymer clay. The miniature waffles can be used alone for displays, or made very thin and rolled into waffle cones or baskets for miniature ice cream.
    If a bendable polymer clay is used, thin waffles can be moulded into dessert cups after baking while still warm.
    If you don't have a doll house waffle press, the same technique will let you make pancakes. Just make sure you press the dough with a smooth rolling pin or tile so that you avoid giant sized fingerprints on your 1:12 scale pancakes!


    Materials for Making Dolls House Scale Waffles or Pancakes
    Dollhouse Waffle Iron and Ochre and White Polymer Clay
    Photo © 2007 Lesley Shepherd
    To make dolls house scale waffles you will need:
    • Polymer Clay in Ochre/Gold and White. I used small amounts of Fimo Classic # 17 and #0.
    • A 1:12 scale miniature metal waffle iron (or a clay roller to roll out miniature pancakes) or a waffle stamp to create miniature foods made from polymer clay in your choice of shapes.
    • A release agent for your polymer clay (fimo releases from molds with talcum/baby powder, Premo clays will release with water)
    • Burnt Umber (brown) acrylic paint and a fine paintbrush, or brown artist’s pastel, chalk or watercolor pencil to add baked color to waffles or pancakes. (I use Pan Pastels

    Mix the Polymer Clay for Dolls House Waffles
    Equal amounts of Ochre and White Fimo Classic Blended to Give a Waffle Color
    Photo © 2007 Lesley Shepherd
    If this is your first attempt at working with polymer clay for dolls house miniatures or miniature foods, read the Basics of Polymer Clay first to ensure you handle it safely.
    Mix equal amounts of yellow ochre and white polymer clay until they are completely blended. If you use a different brand than the Fimo Classic shown here, you may need to adjust the color by adding beige or brown along with yellow. You want a base color which is tan like a partially cooked pancake or waffle. This document shows how to blend your own polymer clay colors from the three primary colors of red, blue and yellow


    Form and Bake Dolls House Waffles or Pancakes
    Polymer Clay Waffles Ready for Baking/Curing
    Photo © 2007 Lesley Shepherd
    To Make Dolls House or Miniature Scale Waffles
    • Lightly coat the 1:12 scale waffle iron with talcum powder (or for Premo clays, water) as a release agent.
    • Press a small ball of polymer clay into the dolls house waffle iron. If your waffle iron allows, you can press both sides of the waffle. Some waffle irons will not meet close enough together to do this.
    • Remove the waffle gently from the mold and place molded side up, or best side up in a baking tray. Try to make the waffles as thin as possible so that they will remain close to scale.
    • If you don't have a waffle iron, stamp the waffle texture out onto a piece of thin polymer clay using a miniature waffle stamp you can make from scrap clay.
    • Bake according to directions for your polymer clay.
    To Make Pancakes
    • Put a small amount of talcum powder (or use a damp work surface for Premo clays) on your work surface, or use bakers parchment paper as a base.
    • Form small balls of your base color polymer clay.
    • Use a smooth roller to flatten the polymer clay into pancakes.
    • Carefully remove them to the baking tray, or place your baker’s parchment with the pancakes on it in the baking tray.
    • Bake according to the directions for your polymer clay.

    Shaping Dolls House Scale Waffles
    If you want miniature waffle pieces to place on dolls house plates, separate the waffle sections with a knife (used only for non food purposes) after baking. More flexible polymer clays can be bent into curved waffle bowls after baking. If you are working with a less flexible clay (Fimo classic for example), shape the waffle bowl before you bake it (with the waffle pattern on the side of the bowl which will be noticed most in your display).
    If your waffle bowl appears to have edges which are too thick, sand them with sandpaper (wear a dust mask or respirator) so that they appear the correct scale, you can cover the sanded edges of a waffle bowl with brown paint to resemble chocolate later.


    Add Fresh Baked Color to Your Dolls House Waffles or Pancakes
    The waffle pieces on the left have been colored with an artist's watercolor pencil to add reailism.
    Lesley Shepherd
    Your freshly baked 1:12 scale miniature waffles or pancakes will not look real yet. They need to have a toasted or baked surface.
    Mix up a solution of brown acrylic paint, or use appropriate artist’s pastels or a watercolor pencil to create color on the upper edges of the waffle pattern (or all except the outside edge of a pancake). Use a dry brush technique to apply acrylic paint if that is what you are using, you want the polymer clay surface to show through. Use fixatives after applying watercolor or artist’s pastels if you use them instead so that your dolls house food can handled without losing its color.


    Assemble Your Display of Dolls House Waffles or Pancakes
    Dolls house waffles with blackberries, cream and syrup, or syrup and butter.
    Photo © 20007 Lesley Shepherd
    Remember to put your best dolls house waffle sample on top where it will be seen! Syrup can be made by adding a very small amount of brown acrylic paint or watercolor paint to Clear Tar Gel Acrylic Medium and dripping it over the surface of the miniature waffle.
    Whipped cream can be made by adding white acrylic paint to Regular Gel Acrylic Medium. Melting butter is a piece of scrap cured polymer clay, painted butter color, with a dollop of tar gel mixed with the same butter color running over the top and sides.
    Use brown acrylic paint for a chocolate edge to a waffle bowl.
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    Re: Làm đồ ăn mô hình

    Make Dolls House Miniature Polymer Clay Muffins and Cupcakes (Fairy Cakes)
    Miniature polymer clay muffin or cupcake shapes can be iced with acrylic paint to make a variety of cupcakes, fairy cakes, or decorated muffins.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    This assortment of dollhouse scale muffins and cupcakes (fairy cakes) are made from polymer clay using a simple mold made from two part silicone mold putty. With a variety of polymer clay blends, you can make any muffin, or cupcake flavor you want. After the clay has baked (cured) you can ice your creations with acrylic paint and add decorations made from polymer clay.
    The mold for these muffins uses either electrical marettes from the hardware store or building supply store, or a suitable cap from a squeeze tube. The key is to find a shape with small lines, similar to the lines made by a baking cup in a muffin pan.
    Similar molds in various sizes can be used to make standard white casserole dishes, even small Crème Brûlée dishes from suitable squeeze caps. If you use acrylic paint in the same mold, you can make cupcake papers, or muffin pan liners to add to a baking prep display.


    Materials to Make Dollhouse Scale Muffin or Cupcake Molds
    Materials used to make molds for dolls house miniature scale muffins and cupcakes (fairy cakes) include tube caps and two part silicone mold putty.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To Make Doll House Scale Polymer Clay Muffins or Cupcakes You Will Need:
    • Two Part Silicone Mold Putty or another mold making material that will work with polymer clay (Plaster of Paris is one) There are a wide variety of silicone mold putties available, many online. Silicone mold putty is useful for many miniature projects, some types can also be used with food and candy. The putty will keep in a cool place out of sunlight for several years.
    • Electrical Marettes or suitably sized tops from household product tubes. Marettes (which join wires together in an electrical box) or tube tops have a ridged pattern which resembles the flutes in a muffin or cupcake pastry case. You may want to sand off any numbers or raised surfaces which will stick out from the area which will become the bottom of your muffin.
    • Polymer Clay in colors suitable for miniature baking. I used an ochre and a chocolate brown for the samples shown in these instructions.
    • Acrylic Paint to decorate cupcakes (fairy cakes) White acrylic in tubes is a good thickness for creating icing, you can tint it with liquid craft acrylics or with watercolors or other tube acrylics. You can also add a gloss or matte gel medium to liquid craft acrylics to create a range of icing colors in a suitable thickness of paint.

    Mix Silicone Putty to Make a Simple Miniature Mold
    Equal amounts of both parts of two part silicone mold putty are set up next to the tube cap which will be molded to make a miniature muffin, cupcake, or creme brulee mold.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Two part silicone putties are mixed by taking equal amounts of both types of putty (the brand here is sold in blue and white colors) and blending the two together. The material is safe to handle and mixes easily. Have your mold objects ready (marettes or tube caps for mini muffins / cupcakes) as the putty will set up fairly quickly once it is mixed.
    Preparing a Cap for a Mold To make a mold you need a section of a tube cap or the base of an electrical marette which has fine ridges. The closed flat top of a marette can be pushed down into the mold making material and will form a cup shape with ridges suitable for making mini muffins. Caps from household tubes (I found a useful one on a tube of glue) may need to have their open end filled with plastercine or waste polymer clay in order to make a flat end for the bottom of your muffin mold. My glue cap had a rounded top I didn't want in my mold, but the part of the cap where it screws on was perfect once I filled in the open end.
    Mixing the Putty Take equal amounts of each color of putty as shown above and blend it with your hands until it is a uniform color. The putty sets fairly quickly, and some putties are faster than others, so have everything ready before you start.


    Make a Mold For Dollhouse Cupcakes From a Household Tube Cap
    Just mixed silicone putty is pressed up around a tube cap and left to set to make a simple silicone mold.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    When your putty is well blended, set it down on a suitable flat surface and press the filled end of your tube, or the flat top of your electrical marette gently into the putty. Press the soft putty carefully up against the sides of the cap or marette as shown above. Do not press your form too deeply into the putty or your mold will have a hole in it's base. Leave the mold putty to harden. You can test whether the putty has hardened by pressing a fingernail gently to the mold material away from your master shape.
    When the putty has hardened, carefully remove your shape from the mold. If the mold is thin on the bottom, or too thin on the sides, you can add some additional putty to the base or the sides. When it cures it will stick to the first set of putty. If you are not sure of how much putty you need, either have extra shapes available to use up any extra putty on other molds, or make a small amount and mix and add more putty if you need it. The putty will not stick to your basic shape, but it will stick to itself.


    Make Multiple Sizes of Dollhouse Muffins/Cupcakes In the Same Mold
    Three sizes of electrical marettes used to make a mold for polymer clay muffins in dollhouse scale.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    You may want to make a variety of slightly different dolls house molds for various projects based on the fluted flat based cylinder. Here three different electrical marette sizes were set into the same mold to make three slightly different sized fluted molds. The molds can be used for small cylindrical casseroles or mis en place dishes as well for muffins or paper muffin/cupcake cases made by coating the inside of the mold with acrylic paint and allowing it to dry.
    It is easier to make a group of three or four related small items in the same mold. Combination molds are less difficult to lose, and more stable to work in. If you make molds with too many items, it may be hard to pop the molded items from the center of the mold.
    If you prefer to use a mold material other than silicone putty, you may need to coat your master object with mold release or vegetable oil to get it to come out of the solidified mold.
    Plaster of Paris can be used to make simple molds for polymer clay. Prepare a small waxed milk carton, box or waste plastic container. Cutting it off at a suitable height for your mold. Set a bit of modelling clay evenly across the bottom of your mold box. Turn your mold forms (marettes or tube caps) upside down and press them into the modelling clay so the part you want to mold is sticking out of the clay. Coat them with a light spray of vegetable oil. Pour in the mixed Plaster of Paris and allow it to set hard. Remove the box or waste plastic, and the modelling clay and the mold shapes. Leave your plaster mold to dry out thoroughly before you use it. Plaster of Paris molds work for simple shapes as long as the open end (where you put in the polyclay) is wider than the base of the mold. To keep the polyclay from sticking to the plaster press mold, you may have to spray it lightly with water before you use it.



    Shape Dollhouse Muffins or Cupcakes With a Mold
    These dollhouse scale muffins and cupcakes as well as cup cake papers have been shaped in a mold made from small electrical marettes.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    A dollhouse muffin or cupcake mold is easy to use. Start by making a small ball of suitably colored polymer clay. Press the clay firmly into your mold, Leave the top of the ball overhanging the fluted base of the mold, trimming it to size if necessary. Muffins usually have large overhangs above the base, cupcakes or fairy cakes have less of an overhang. Round the top of your muffin or cupcake and gently remove it from the mold. If you are using a Plaster of Paris mold you may need to turn the mold over and tap it gently. Depending on your polymer clay you can spray the Plaster mold with water to make it release the clay easier. Some polymer clays will work better with talc (baby powder) as a release agent instead of water. Reshape the top of your muffin / cupcake if necessary and set it aside while you make a complete batch.
    For Fruit Muffins Fruit and Chocolate Chip muffins can be made by adding prebaked bits of polymer clay (grated baked chocolate colored clay, or small baked flattened raisin or cranberry shapes). Prebake these shapes before adding them. Unbaked clay pressed into the mold may smear, instead of holding a fruit or chocolate bit shape. This is a good way to use up bits of baked clay that didn't turn out the way you intended.
    Cure (bake) the miniature muffins or cupcakes according to the directions for your brand of polymer clay.


    Decorating or Icing Dolls House Cupcakes With Acrylic Paint
    Ice miniature cupcakes (fairy cakes) by putting them back into the silicone mold to hold them securely.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    The dolls house scale cupcakes need to be held firmly in order to decorate or ice them. It is easiest to set them into the original mold which will hold them secure while you work.
    To Make Colored Icings Mix white tube acrylic paint with watercolor paint or liquid acrylics to make a suitable icing color. You can apply the paint with a stiff brush, a toothpick or a small spatula or flat piece of plastic to create the effect of icing. If you want to pipe icing or cream effects on the tops of your cakes, use small piping nozzles or a plastic syringe, and pipe tube acrylic paint stiffened with acrylic medium onto the tops of your cakes. If you want a simple ridged piping effect you can use a fine razor blade to cut small notches into the end of a plastic syringe to create a star effect piping nozzle. You need a steady hand and a fine blade to cut the notches!
    You can decorate the tops of your cupcakes with tiny no hole beads (stand in for dragees), fine colored sand (stand in for colored sugar) or flowers or fruit slices made from polymer clay. The instructions for Polymer Clay Citrus Canes (lemon, lime, orange) are given here.
    Painted On Pastry Cases You can mimic the effect of a paper pastry case on the bottom of your muffin or cupcake using a light wash of white acrylic paint muddied with a slight amount of brown. Try to keep the line of your paint even with the base of the muffin or cupcake top.


    Using Your Mini Muffin Mold for Pastry Cases or Other Miniatures
    A range of dolls house muffins, cupcakes and fairy cakes including papers, made using a simple silicone mold.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Using the Mold to Make Pastry Cases To make paper pastry cases (muffin cups) for a baking scene using your miniature muffin mold, paint the inside of the mold with acrylic paint and set it aside to dry. If your particular paint is too brittle for this, you may need to add acrylic mediums to the paint to get it to be more flexible. This process will only work with a silicone mold. Acrylic paint will stick to a plaster mold and ruin it. When the paint is dry, remove it carefully from the silicone mold and set it gently aside for your scene. You may need to use multiple coats of paint to get acceptable pastry cases. The muffin in the pastry case shown above was not set into a pastry case, but had a wash of acrylic applied to give it the effect of being set in one. See the instructions in the previous step.
    If you have fine tissue paper, you can, with patience, make paper pastry cups by gently pressing a punched circle of paper into the mold, using a fine embossing tool to push the paper gently into the lines on the mold.
    Make Small Polymer Clay Dishes Press a thin layer of polymer clay into the muffin mold and smooth it out on the inside with a rubber or silicone tipped modelling tool. Set the clay aside in the mold to harden, then carefully remove it from the mold and bake it. Trim it to shape immediately after baking when the clay is still flexible. Numerous small casserole dishes can be made this way.
    Pop Overs, Buns, Individual Yorkshire Puddings I use a very similar sized mold, one with straight rather than ridged sides, to make pop overs, buns and individual servings of Yorkshire pudding for doll house meals.
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    Re: Làm đồ ăn mô hình

    Make Dolls House Scale Cookies For Miniature Scenes
    A tray of assorted iced cookies in dolls house scale made from polymer clay, acrylic paint and beads.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    These dollhouse cookies look real but they are made from polymer clay, acrylic paints, sand and beads. Cookies are an easy project to make in miniature from polymer clay. They don't require much in the way of materials and you can make an almost endless variety to accompany any miniature setting or special holiday.
    The cookies don't need any special tools to make, and you can use materials you have on hand to decorate them. You only need small amounts of material for decorations, so cookies finishes are always a good idea for trades or sharing out at club meetings.
    If you are unfamiliar with polymer clay read The Basics of Polymer Clay
    All the cookies shown here were made from basic colors of Premo clay, blended to make colors suitable for baked goods. The colors of clay used to make the blends were Cadmium Red Hue, Zinc Yellow, Cobalt Blue Hue, White and Translucent. Fimo Liquid Gel was blended with some colors to make glazes for some of the cookies.


    Mix a Basic Cookie Dough From Polymer Clay
    A basic color for polymer clay miniature baking is made from three quarters white, one quarter translucent (porcelain) and small amounts of ochre brown and red if necessary.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    The basic cookie or pastry dough for miniature baking is made by mixing 3/4 white clay with 1/4 translucent (porcelain) clay and adding ochre colored clay to it until you have a basic dough color for your baking. Ochre clay is made by at least two parts of yellow clay into one part of brown clay.
    Whenever you mix clay colors by hand, try to mix no more than 1/4 of a block in total. This is usually the largest amount that is comfortable to blend in one time in your hand.
    To blend the clay roll the small amounts of color out into a clay 'worm' and then roll that worm into the main colors of clay, repeatedly bending, and re-rolling the clay until the color is solid with no streaks or stripes. If you are mixing other colors of clay for other projects, make sure you clean your hands with alcohol based wipes or rubbing alcohol between color mixes. Even a small amount of the wrong color on your hands can create a grey color in a new mix.
    A lot of cookie dough can be made from just 1/8 of a block of clay in total. Don't mix any more than this unless you are making cookies or pastries for several scenes at once.


    Add Texture if Wanted and Roll Out Clay To a Uniform Thickness
    Add texture to dollhouse baking made from polymer clay by adding sand.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    If you want your dough to have a visible texture that shows up when you break the cookies apart, or when you have undecorated cookies, add texture to the polymer clay before you bake it. It is best to add textures which are inert, rather than textures based on seeds or other foods which may attract insects to your finished miniatures. For the cookies in these instructions I used fine untinted sand, available for 'sand art' in the children's section of a craft shop. Other inert materials (gritty bits of chalk) would work as well.
    To roll out the dough to a uniform thickness, set it on your working/baking tile or a piece of tinfoil, between two narrow lengths of wood or plastic. I used coffee stir sticks. Now run your clay roller over the clay pressing down on it to roll it to a uniform thickness by pressing the clay down until the roller runs smoothly on the plastic or wood rails.
    The photo above shows clay which is untextured rolled to thickness and clay which has sand added for texture. You can adjust the amount of sand you add to achieve the texture you want.
    For some cookies, ones which have texture due to added fruit, nuts or chocolate, you can bake small amounts of the correct colors of polymer clay and chop them to add them into unbaked dough. That method will be shown in a later step where it is used to make chocolate chip cookies.


    Use a Straw or Custom Cookie Cutters to Form Your Cookie Shapes
    Custom cookie cutters for dolls house cookies have been made from drinking straws and strips of foil cut from baking pans.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Use the instructions for making custom cookie cutter shapes from heavy foil or drinking straws or prepare a simple round cutter by cutting a 1/2 inch section of drinking straw and curving it to a slight shape. Commercial cookie cutter shapes are available from specialist dolls house suppliers, but shapes are easily made using the instructions linked above. If you want drop style, undecorated cookies, use a drinking straw to create the rough round shape for your cookie.


    Cut Cookie Shapes From Polymer Clay Dough
    Polymer clay is rolled out between two narrow sticks to make an even 'dough' then cut into shapes with miniature cookie cutters sized for dollhouse scale.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    With your polymer clay 'dough' rolled out to the correct thickness, dip a straw or your custom cookie cutters into a small amount of talcum (baby) powder and press the cutter firmly into the dough. Fit the cutter shapes carefully across your dough to get the most amount of cookies from the rolled polymer clay.
    When you have cut out the basic shapes, use tweezers to gently pull up the scrap 'dough' from around the cut out shapes. Leave your shapes on the tile (or heavy foil) and you can bake them once they are cut for basic cookies to decorate. If you want to apply textures or glazes proceed to the next step before you bake your cookies. The flat untextured cookies produced by this method resemble sugar cookies, and don't need texturing as they are usually covered with decorations. If you need some raw and some baked cookies without decorations for a scene, you may want to texture your cookies slightly before you bake them.


    Adding Baking Color to Polymer Clay Cookies
    These polymer clay cookies are shown in their raw and baked states after the addition of a bit of pastel to give them a baked look.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    The photo above shows polymer clay 'cookies' which look unbaked, and some which look baked. Both sets have been cured by baking in the oven to the temperature recommended on the package. The cookies with the slightly browned edges have been colored slightly on the edges to give them the look of browned baking. You can use several different materials to create this browned effect. You can:
    • Paint the cookies slightly with a wash of ochre colored acrylic paint mixed with a lot of water.
    • Paint the cookies with an ochre wash of watercolor paint.
    • Use ochre or yellow brown scrapbooking chalks to rub a bit of color on the surface and edges of the cookies.
    • Use artists pastels to rub color on the edges of the cookies. I used Panpastels 'orange shade' which gives my cookies a nice just baked finish.
    Pastels can be baked onto the clay as it cures if you wish, paints should be applied after the clay has been cured in an oven.


    Adding Texture to Polymer Clay Cookies Before Baking
    Dollhouse scale cookies made from polymer clay and textured and finished with bits of baked clay or liquid Fimo.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Realistic textures can be added to your polymer clay cookies before you bake or cure them. A number of tools work well to make tiny holes in the clay surface. I use stiff a stencil brush or stiff art brush, but a clean (run through a dishwasher) retired toothbrush works well. To make a crumb structure on your clay for cookies, you can use a stiff fine textured sponge, pumice stone, or artificial foot pumice, many come with both pumice and sandpaper textures.
    To Add Texture shape the edges of your cookie (many cookies soften at the edges and are puffier in the center), gently brush off finger print marks, then press texture into the clay surface.
    Adding Texture With Scraps of Polymer Clay Inclusions in cookies (chocolate chips, nuts, raisins) are made by baking small amounts of clay in the correct color, then chopping the baked clay into bits before it cools completely (it is easier to cut when warm). Small bits of baked translucent clay can also be shaved from a baked block to make coconut threads, or chopped with several shades of brown to resemble chopped nuts.
    Adding Colored Glazes Most polymer clay brands can be mixed with a bit of Fimo Liquid Clay to create colored glazed icing effects with a lot of gloss. (the high gloss doesn't show well in the photo above). To make these glazes, place a small amount of liquid Fimo on your baking tile, and drop a few crumbs of colored unbaked clay onto the clear. Leave it to soften for a few minutes, then mix the colored clay into the clear liquid with a toothpick. Use the toothpick or a stiff brush to dab the glaze onto baked or unbaked clay cookies or tarts. Bake the glazed clay miniatures at the temperature recommended for the liquid Fimo. Liquid Fimo works better than other liquid clays as it is more translucent after baking, and gives a better shine and transparent effect.


    Decorating Dolls House Scale Cookies
    Decorations suitable for dolls house scale baking.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Decorations for Tiny Cookies

    A number of materials can be used to decorate miniature cookies made from polymer clay.
    • For Colored Sugar Crystals - fine sand from children's setion of the craft store used for sand art is great. Share colors with other miniaturists as this sand is usually sold in pounds. Some scrapbook inks will color/dye fine sand, so you might be able to get by with white sand only, if you have some colored inks already and don't mind a bit of mess while you dye sand with ink.
    • Dragees- In case that isn't what they are called where you live, dragees are the little silver, gold and colored metallic sugar balls used to decorate cakes and cookies. An effective substitute in miniature are the tiny metallic micro beads the big box craft stores sell in the stamp or scrapbooking section. I look for the multicolored mixes. That way I get three or more colors in small amounts.
    • Butter Cream and Marshmallow Icings I use acrylic paint mixed with acrylic medium to make it stiffer, or glossier and squeeze it out of one of the precision tipped glue bottles.
    • Glaze Icings- for glazes that look like gilding, I use a bit of Jacquard pearl ex powder in pva glue or gloss acrylic. For those hard colored icings that look somewhat transparent, I mix up a bit of liquid fimo with some colored polymer clay until it gets syrupy, then bake it on the polymer clay cookies.
    • Coconut and Some Sugar Finishes. I have found a few very fine white ' micro glitters' which aren't actually very glittery, more like very fine snow that work quite well. These I have found in my local scrapbooking store. Some white embossing powders would probably work as well if you don't heat them up! For longer coconut strands I've also used baked white or translucent white clay and shaved pieces from it or grated it with a two inch cheese grater.

    Displaying Your Tiny Cookies
    This tray of dolls house cookies shows iced and textured cookies ready for an Easter display.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Miniature cookies can be displayed on tiered cake stands, on platters, on cookie sheets, or nested in baskets or boxes. If the colors of the decorations are very bright, they can be wrapped in clear cellophane and set on shelves in a bakery, cafe.
    For scenes where you want to imply a current human presence, you can pull apart a soft polymer clay cookie that is fresh from the oven, to show it broken in parts on a tea cup saucer, or you can remove slightly more rounded chunks with a knife or punch to make it look like a small mouth has taken a bite. In scenes with partially eaten cookies, it is always useful to have a few crumbs of cookie dough to sprinkle onto a plate beside a partially eaten cookie.
    Cookies glazed with liquid fimo and colored clay can be broken apart before baking, then have glaze dripped over the edge of both broken pieces, to show the softness of the coating, this helps create the effect that the cookie has just had a bite taken out of it.
    In scenes with dolls, it is relatively simple to use a bit of miniature/museum wax to fix a cookie to a doll's hand.
    Once you've made some miniature cookies, you might want to make an opening miniature cookie jar.
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    Make a Mold for Dolls House Scale Polymer Clay Pies
    Miniature lemon meringue pie in dolls house scale made from a blend of Preemo. The meringue is acrylic paint.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Small scale pies can be made in sweet or savory versions for all kinds of dolls house and play scale scenes. They are fast to make if you have a mold for your pie crusts or tarts. As you will likely make more than a single pie in your modelling career, you might as well make a mold so that crusts and fillings are easily shaped from polymer clay. The technique works for all scales of models. For 1:12 or standard dollhouse scale, a regular bottle cap makes a good mold master once you clear out any plastic liner. If you can't find a bottle cap the correct size for the scale you work in, make a pie crust or tart shell the size you want from polymer clay, cure it, and when hard, use it to make a mold for the rest of your pies.


    Materials Needed to Make a Miniature Pie Crust Mold.
    Two part silicone and a bottle cap used to make a silicone mold for a dolls house scale pie crust.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To Make a Mold for Doll House Scale Polymer Clay Pies or Pie Crusts You Will Need:
    • Two Part Silicone Mold Putty or another mold making material that will work with polymer clay (Plaster of Paris is one) There are a wide variety of silicone mold putties available, many online. Silicone mold putty is useful for many miniature projects, some types can also be used with food and candy. The putty will keep in a cool place out of sunlight for several years.
    • A Fluted Metal Bottle Cap the correct size for the pie shell you need, or an already baked polymer clay pie shell in the correct size. (empty)
    • Small Beads 1/8 to 1/4 inch diameter to make mold alignment marks. You can use a rounded toothpick to make the marks instead of beads.
    • Mold Release for silicone putty you can use baby or talcum powder as a mold release, for Plaster you will need a light vegetable oil.
    • Polymer Clay in colors suitable for miniature baking. I used the basic dough color for the pie crust shown here. The blends for the lemon filling are given later in this tutorial.
    • Acrylic Paint To make meringue for a lemon pie. White acrylic in tubes is a good thickness for creating meringue. You can add a gloss or matte gel medium to acrylic paint to make it thick enough to hold soft peaks for your meringue.
    • Pastels or Chalks to brown the crust and the meringue of a pie.

    Make The First Side of The Miniature Pie Mold
    Two part silicone mold putty is placed around the outside and top edges of a suitably sized bottle cap to make a mold for dollhouse scale pies.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    The two sided mold for the dolls house pie crust is a simple press mold.
    • Mix the Putty Make the first side by mixing the silicone putty in equal amounts until the color of your mix is consistent.
    • Press in Your Shape Set the bottle cap or a prepared empty pie shell squarely into the putty, leaving at least 1/8 inch under the cap on a flat surface. Gently pull putty up the sides of the cap to the top, without allowing the putty to fall into the center of the cap.
    • Make Mold Alignment Marks A small dent in one or two corners of the mold will act as an alignment mark for the second piece of the mold. Insert a small round bead (1/8 to 1/4 inch diameter) halfway into the mold putty at the edge of the mold or make a small round dent with a toothpick.
    • Let the Putty Set Allow the mold to set then remove the bottle cap
    Make A Simple Press Mold From Plaster
    • Make a Mold Box from a plastic or waxed carton container at least 1/2 inch larger than your pie shell, and 3/4 inch deep.
    • Set Up Your Shape Set some modelling clay evenly into the base of your mold container. Press your pie shell gently top edge down just into the top surface of the modelling clay. This will hold the master or bottle cap in place while you pour in the plaster. Make sure the modelling clay will prevent liquid plaster from coming under the top edge of the pie shell or bottle cap where it touches the modelling clay.
    • Set Your Mold Alignment Marks Press beads halfway down into the modelling clay base, or make a dent in the clay with a toothpick for a mold alignment mark.
    • Apply Oil as Mold Release Coat the interior of your mold box and your master shape with a thin layer of vegetable oil.
    • Mix your Plaster following the directions given with your plaster
    • Pour the Plaster over your shape, filling your mold box approximately half way. Let the plaster set until hardened, then remove it from your shape.

    Make the Second Side of Your Two Part Press Mold
    A mold is made of both the inside and the outside of a bottle cap of the correct scale size for a scale miniature pie crust.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Prepare Your Mold and Master With Mold Release To make the second half of your two part press mold, set your bottle cap or pie shell into the completed first half of your mold. Brush a bit of mold release (talcum powder for the silicone putty, vegetable oil for plaster) over the top edge of the mold, where it will come in contact with the second half (brush a bit of mold release down the top outside edges just in case)
    For a Plaster Mold Set the mold back into the mold box with the top edges of the bottle cap or pie shell facing up and the empty center exposed. Run a thin bead of modelling clay along the edge of your mold where the master object meets the plaster, to keep the next pour of plaster from running back under the object and ruining your mold. Coat the upper face of the plaster mold, as well as the inside of the box and the exposed edges of the object you wish to mold (pie shell or bottle cap) with a thin coating of vegetable oil.
    Mix Your Putty (or Plaster)
    Make the Second Side of the Mold Press your putty into the center of the bottle cap or pie shell, making sure it fits up against the edge of the cap or pie shell. It should overlap the cap enough to fill in the mold alignment marks you made with beads in the previous step. Allow it to set. If you are using plaster, pour the plaster into your prepared (and mold release coated) mold and allow it to set.
    When the second half of your mold has set, gently separate the halves of your mold and remove the master shape. You can cut the silicone mold putty apart with scissors or a knife if the mold release failed.


    Using a Press Mold to Make a Miniature Pie Crust From Polymer Clay
    A two part mold made of silicone putty makes for easily shaped dollhouse scale pies.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To make a miniature pie crust from a simple press mold, roll out a thin layer of polymer clay in a suitable color and thickness for a pie crust and fit it loosely into the bottom of your mold.
    If you are using a plaster press mold, you should spray it lightly with water before you place the poly clay into the plaster mold. The water will act as a mold release for the clay.
    Take the second half of your mold and line up the alignment marks, then press the mold gently down over the polymer clay. (Spray this mold half with water if you are using a plaster mold) Do not press down too hard on the mold.
    When you separate the mold halves, you should have a perfectly shaped pie crust ready to bake (cure) according to the directions for your polymer clay. The molds can be used over and over again, but should be stored in a cool place away from direct sunlight to keep them useful as long as possible.


    Make a Polymer Clay Filling for a Miniature Lemon Meringue Pie
    A blend of equal parts of zinc yellow and translucent polymer clays for realistic lemon pie filling in dolls house scales.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    The lemon pie filling shown here is an equal mix of one part of zinc yellow clay (Preemo!) to one part of translucent clay. The mix is pressed carefully down into a baked (cured) pie crust made from polymer clay and the pie is baked or cured at the correct temperature for the clay.
    Pieces of pie can be cut from the main pie once the filling layer has baked (cured). It is easiest to cut the pie slices from the main pie when the clay is still flexible, just after baking, using a sharp blade (a one sided razor blade works well).

    Make a Meringue Topping For a Miniature Pie From Acrylic Paint
    Miniature lemon meringue pie in dolls house scale made from a blend of Preemo. The meringue is acrylic paint.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To finish a miniature lemon meringue pie in dolls house scale, the pie is first given a layer of stiff white acrylic paint to act as meringue. Acrylic paint from a tube is easier to use than a layer of white polymer clay for meringues. The paint can be stiffened with acrylic medium to make it form whipped or stiff peaks to mimic whipped egg whites. Acrylic paint will not offgas or create acid conditions for the miniatures around it the way silicone caulk will, so it is a better choice for making shaped finishes for miniatures than bathroom caulk.
    Add a similar meringue coating to any separate pieces of pie, and use a toothpick to pull a bit of acrylic paint down from the top of the pie into the sides of the pie where the piece was removed. Set the meringue coated pie aside to dry.
    When the acrylic paint layer has dried, use a fine pastel (I used Panpastels Orange Shade) to add the effect of browned edges to your pie crust and the peaks of your meringue. Sit back and enjoy your calorie free pie!
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    Make Slices of Bread and Toast in Dolls House Scales
    Plain white bread, toast, toast with honey, bread with chocolate sprinkles, bread with jam, and undecorated raw bread slice made from polymer clay in dolls house scale.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Realism in dolls house food is achieved through attention to shape, color and texture. These miniature slices of bread and toast are the correct thinness and texture for all kinds of food combinations and sandwiches. You can also decorate the slices for scenes on their own as shown. Here the slices are plain white bread, toasted bread, bread with honey, bread with chocolate sprinkles, bread with jam, and a slice of unfinished bread ready to turn into a sandwich, or another style of toast.
    All the basic slices are made by rolling out a thin roll of polymer clay, texturing the clay, then cutting out the slice shapes with a miniature cookie cutter. This makes slices that will match closely for realistic sandwiches.


    Texture and Shape Polymer Clay Bread Slices With Simple Tools
    A custom made cookie cutter for bread slices and three texture plates for bread made from waste polymer clay.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To make bread slices in dolls house scales you will need texturing tools and a cookie cutter to cut out the bread slices.
    To Make Texturing Tools For Bread Slices - Take a conditioned waste piece of polymer clay and press it down on a clean flat surface while pinching the back, in order to make a flat surface with small handle on the back. Press the flat surface onto a piece of pumice, or a piece of fine natural sea sponge, or into the most open side of a section of dry florist foam, to create a texturing tool with fine open lines. If you wish to mark some holes for your breads, add very fine no hole beads to your texturing tool. You can also experiment with bits of sand or other fine grit, baked onto the surface of the tool. When you have created a texture you think will give you some useful texture for bread, bake your tool according to the directions for your polymer clay. When finished the tool can be used to texture small pieces of clay to make bread or cakes, or it can be stamped over a larger rolled out section of clay before you cut individual slices from it. Remember that on your texturing tool, any raised sections will become depressions in the actual slice of miniature bread.
    To Make A Cutter for Slices of Bread - Follow the basic instruction for making cookie cutters from foil strips with handles of polymer clay. Heavy foil from a baking pan is ideal, but you may also find suitable foil in a scrapbook supply store. You want to make a cookie cutter the correct dimensions and shape for a slice of bread in your particular scale. In general, slices of bread will have rounded edges, which overlap the sides slightly on the top. The top usually also has a small dent towards the centre. You can easily make a range of different shaped cutters for different styles of bread slice if you wish.


    Shape and Cut Dollhouse Scale Bread Slices
    Honey and jam are mixed on a baking tile from liquid Fimo and colored polymer clay.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To Make Dolls House Scale Slices of Miniature Bread
    • Mix a Suitable Color of Polymer Clay - Choose a suitable mixture of clay colors for the type of bread you want to make and mix them into a bread dough color. For white bread you can use a version of the basic dough mix in polymer clay, with more white and less red and ochre clay. If you want to make whole wheat style breads, add very finely chopped or grated bits of baked polymer clay, as well as very fine sand to the dough mix to create the effect of pieces of grain in the bread slice.
    • Roll The Clay Out On A Baking Tile or Surface - Roll the clay out to the correct thickness for the slice of bread you want to make. Most slices of bread are 1/2 inch or less thick, which in 1:12 scale means you need clay which is 1/24 inch thick. You can use playing cards on either side of your clay roller to set an appropriate thickness of clay.
    • Texture the Clay Surface - Use your texturing tools to stamp a texture into the clay surface. You can further texture the clay after you have cut individual slices if you wish.
    • Cut Out Your Bread Slices Dip your custom cookie cutter in talcum powder or corn starch and shake off the excess. Use the cutter to cut individual bread slices from your rolled and textured dough. Leave the slices attached to the tile but gently peel away the excess clay for future use.
    • Finish Texturing Your Slices Use a stiff paint brush if you wish to gently texture the surface of your bread slice further. If you wish you can use a pin to make some elongated holes completely through your bread slice as they appear in some types of bread. At this point you can either bake your bread slices, or prepare your bread toppings from polymer clay and bake them at the same time.
    • Make Toppings For Sliced Breads If you wish you can bake topping made from polymer clay at the same time as you bake your bread slices. Make Jam In the photo above you can see liquid fimo clay mixed incompletely with red polymer clay to make a blobby mix of partially melted strawberry jam. For individual slices of toast, make the jam section a separate layer using the slice cutter as a guide for the size of the jam portion. Make Honey Honey is made the same way as jam by combining a small amount of ochre or caramel colored clay with liquid Fimo Clay. Use the tip of a pin to spread the honey out in a zig- zag pattern that will fit on a single slice of bread.
    Bake your slices and toppings according to the directions for your polymer clay.

    Add Dollhouse Scale Polymer Clay Chocolate or Colored Sprinkles To Bread Slices
    Very fine rolls of polymer clay designed to make miniature chocolate sprinkles, along with unbaked dolls house scale bread slices from polymer clay.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To make dolls house scale sprinkles for toppings for dolls house baking, roll out very fine rolls of polymer clay in your choice of colors. The clay must be stretched and rolled to the finest possible thread of polymer clay. The 'chocolate' sprinkle rolls above are the smallest that could be made with this particular clay. You can see how large they are in comparison to the slice of 1:12 scale dolls house bread in the top of the photo.
    Bake the clay according to the instructions for your particular brand. When the clay has baked, take a very sharp clay blade or craft knife, and cut the fine strands of clay into the tiniest pieces you can manage. Collect the pieces carefully in a small container to keep for later use.
    If you use brightly colored orange, pink, blue and yellow clays, you can make scale 'hundreds and thousands' or colored sprinkles for doughnuts, cookies, cakes and fairy bread. Making the sprinkles from chocolate colored clay makes chocolate sprinkles for rum balls, bread with chocolate sprinkles (a special treat for Dutch children) or decorations for cookies or cakes in miniature.


    Add Crusts or Toasting and Toppings To Miniature Slices of Bread
    Plain white bread, toast, toast with honey, bread with chocolate sprinkles, bread with jam, and undecorated raw bread slice made from polymer clay in dolls house scale.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To Add Crusts To Miniature Bread Slices - Mix ochre colored acrylic paint with a small amount of brown and red or orange paint. When you have a color suitable for the crusts of your particular type of bread, apply it to the tip of a small paintbrush, and brush it gently over the sides only, of your bread slices. If some paint strays onto the surface of your bread wipe it off with a small section of make up sponge, or a piece of tissue paper. Set your bread slices aside for the paint to dry.
    To Add the Effect of Toast To Miniature Bread - Brush an ochre colored pastel or chalk gently over the surface of your finished bread slice, allowing the color to build up on the raised surfaces. Add a second layer of darker brown chalk in some areas to make it look more strongly toasted.
    To Add Honey Glue the zig zags of clear polymer clay you made in the previous step to the surface of a slice of toasted or untoasted bread. You can add this as a second layer to your finished bread and re bake it to set the honey (or jam) layer made from liquid fimo. If you wish the effect of butter, you can brush on a pale yellow acrylic paint (thicker tube acrylic will look like thick, cold butter) onto the bread, then set the honey layer over that once it has dried.
    To Add Jam Apply a layer of acrylic paint to represent butter or margarine (thin, darker colored paint brushed into the texture of the slice will resemble melted margarine or butter) Add your section of jam (pre baked) to the top of your buttered bread slice. If you prefer you can omit the buttered layer and apply liquid Fimo directly to your bread slices when you first bake them. Glue your jam layer in place (pva glue works fine).
    To Add Candy or Chocolate Sprinkles - Arrange a fine layer of baked polymer clay sprinkles on a smooth surface (a baking tile works fine). Apply a thin layer of pva glue to your chosen bread slice, and using tweezers, turn it upside down and press it down into the sprinkle layer. Gently lift the slice of bread with the sprinkles now attached, and turn it right side over. Set it aside for the glue to dry.
    Nut Butters and Other Toppings Toppings which resemble peanut butter, or have the texture of icing, can be easily made by coloring tube acrylic paint the correct color and adding it to the bread slice with a toothpick or texturing tool to make it look like it has been spread by a knife. Set the slice with its acrylic paint 'spread' aside to dry. This technique works well for soft cheese, butter, peanut butter, hazelnut chocolate spread, marshmallow paste, and any other type of spread commonly used on bread.
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    Wobbly Jellys, Gelatines and Aspics in Dolls House Scales
    Wobbly jellies or gelatin desserts from molds in dollhouse scale made with colored layers of scenic water.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Miniature gelatin desserts need to have a convincing wobble to look realistic in scale and dolls house scenes. One particular resin product, Scenic Water from Deluxe Materials, creates a very convincing jelly, and is very easy to use. The only downside of these gelatin like miniatures is that they do have a slightly soft surface which will attract dust. If you want them in a dolls house scene, try to place them somewhere dust free.
    What is Scenic Water

    Scenic Water is a one part meltable resin product used by adult modellers to create water effects in scale scenes. It melts at a low temperature (55 - 60 degrees F) and cures to a thick rubbery gelatin consistency (think Jello jiggler shapes). The product does not have a strong odor and can easily be melted in a hot water bath. It can be poured into molds treated with fine oil as a mold release, and when set, a few minutes after pouring, it can be slid out of the mold. Flat sheets of the material can be cut with dolls house cookie cutters or other metal cutters (Kemper cutters) to make gelatin like shapes. It can be colored with food coloring or water color pigments and can be remelted and repoured if necessary. It does not have much shrinkage when set, but it does have a slightly sticky surface. As Scenic Water melts at low temperatures it should not be placed next to a heat source in a dolls house or left in a position is strong sunlight or it will melt. Scenic Water is not a flammable gel like candle gels. This is a different product, developed for modelling of scale liquids. It is not recommended for use by children

    Materials Needed to Make Miniature Molded Gelatins in Dolls House Scales
    Scenic water in its unformed state is similar to very dense gelatine.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To Make Wobbly Jellies and Gelatins in Dolls House Scales You will Need:
    • Scenic Water Made by Deluxe Materials - a low melt resin used to model water in railroad and other scale scenes.
    • Coloring You can use water color pigments for clear layers, or use acrylics for cloudy layers. Food coloring also works, but may fade.
    • Disposable Mixing Tubs Small clear plastic containers work best for mixing colors with the melted Scenic Water
    • Dollhouse Scale Gelatin Molds with clearly defined shapes and lines on the inside.
    • Mineral Oil fine baby oil or light olive oil to use as a mold release.
    • Polymer Clay Fruit Pieces or Slices to mix with the Scenic Water to give the effect of fruit or salad layers
    • Glass or Plastic Container for Water Bath A shallow water bath is best for melting the small amounts of scenic water necessary for dolls house gelatine. A dish that can be heated in the microwave is useful.
    • Disposable Spoon for mixing colors into the Scenic Water.

    How to Melt Scenic Water
    Scenic Water melts easily in a hot water bath.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To prepare the Scenic Water to make dolls house jellies or gelatin molds, you need to melt the Scenic Water. Use a disposable spoon to remove an appropriate sized piece of Scenic Water from the jar. You will need an amount which is slightly larger than the volume of your gelatin mold(s). Set this piece of Scenic Water gel into a small clean disposable container.
    Put an inch of water or less into the bottom of a microwavable container and heat it almost to the boiling point. Alternatively you can use very hot tap water, or heat the water in a kettle. Set your container of Scenic Water into the hot water bath. It should melt very quickly. When your Scenic Water has melted, remove the container from the water bath. If you want to use different colored layers in your molds, divide your melted scenic water into separate containers for each color.


    Add Coloring to Scenic Water
    Mix small amounts of watercolor pigment or food coloring with melted Scenic Water to make custom colors.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    With your Scenic Water divided into one container for each color, add a small amount of water color pigment to the scenic water to color it. Tube watercolor, which is almost pure pigment works best, although you can add pan watercolor mixed with a tiny amount of water to the scenic water. If you want opaque colors, use white acrylic mixed with scenic water and add watercolor pigments, or use small amounts of liquid acrylic paint. You do not want to add a lot of water to the Scenic Water when you add color.
    To obtain the best colors, mix a small amount of scenic water with the watercolor paint on a flat glass tile and blend the paint and scenic water until the color is completely transparent. When the color is fully blended, add the colored Scenic Water back into the rest of the Scenic Water you set aside for that color, and mix it thoroughly. If your Scenic Water begins to set before you have it completely mixed, set the container back into a hot water bath to remelt it.
    Complete this mixing process for each of the colors you want to use for your layered gelatins.


    Prepare the Mold for Your Dolls House Gelatin
    A small amount of baby oil on a paper towel is used to oil the inside of a dolls house scale gelatine mold.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To make sure your miniature gelatine will come out of your mold, wipe the inside of the mold with a paper towel you have dipped in mineral oil or baby oil. This will make sure your shape will come out of the mold when it is set. If you forget this step, you can dip the mold in hot water, but it will partially melt some of your scenic water and may shift the shape of your gelatine.
    For gelatins with multi colored layers, use as large a mold as possible. This will allow you to create thicker more noticeable layers of each clear color. If you don't have a mold, you can make a tray from a piece of cooking foil, and pour your colored Scenic Water into that to make thin layers you can cut with polymer clay cutters, or dolls house cookie cutters to make gelatine shapes. These make lovely aspic layers for dolls house crackers. Alternatively you can cut plain gelatine cubes from a poured layer of Scenic Water to make cut up dessert jelly. If you cut squares of clear uncolored Scenic water after it has set, you can place these in partially set layers of colored Scenic Water to create an ice effect. The clear cubes may melt slightly but that will increase the effect of ice in drinks or desserts


    Pouring Thin Colored Layers of Scenic Water for Multi Colored Dollhouse Desserts
    Thin layers of melted scenic water poured into dolls house molds in thin layers to make multi- colored gelatines.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Plan Your Colors
    To pour thin colored layers for molded gelatine salads or dolls house scale desserts, think carefully how you want your layers and colors to appear. Some colors will affect the color above or below them. Molded gelatin salads are best made from a clear colored layer, with polymer clay vegetable bits added if you wish, above a white or pastel layer for contrast. The white base of the gelatin mold will bring out the clear colored layer above it. The colors can also be poured in flat molds like the fish mold shown here, to create multi colored patterns.
    When you have determined which colors will be on the top and the bottom, remelt your colored Scenic Water and pour it carefully into your mold. Layers can be used to highlight the shapes in the mold by pouring to a certain level on the sides of the mold. Many round molds have a decorative top which can be highlighted by a particular color, with the plain main body of the mold broken into multicolored striped layers. If you misjudged the amount of Scenic Water needed to fill your mold to a certain level, you can use a disposable spoon or a toothpick to drip bits of Scenic Water into particular sections of the mold.


    Pouring Scenic Water Layers for Specific Jelly Mold Details
    The first colored layer of Scenic Water is carefully poured in to a copper fish mold to form a blue layer for the top of a dolls house gelatine fish.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To highlight the scale details in this fish shaped jelly mold, the darkest layer is poured first, and lined up carefully with the outline of the fins, and the mold is left for the layer to set. Once the first layer has set, the second layer is poured and so on.
    Temperatures of Later Colored Layers
    As the Scenic Water melts at a very low temperature, it is advisable to let the various colored layers set individually before the next layer is poured. It also helps to let the Scenic Water cool after melting until it starts to thicken before you add it on top of an already poured layer. This will help keep the new layer from remelting the one it is going in on top of.


    Dolls House Fish Jelly Mold Details
    Three different colored layers of Scenic Water are combined in a doll house mold to make this miniature gelatin fish for a dolls house picnic.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    After the first layer of blue was poured in the main body area, a second layer of turquoise green was added to the entire body, and finally a layer of pale green was set on the top of the mold, to create a pale base as contrast for the fish gelatine. Colors can be swirled through layers, or lines of scales picked out in different colors on flat jelly molds like this one. It is important to find a jelly mold with good detail if you want to have good results making models of miniature food.


    Red, White And Blue Dolls House Jelly Mold Detail
    A multi layered dolls house scale gelatin mold made from colored layers of Scenic Water.
    Photo copyright 2009 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    This mold was poured with very thin layers to see what would happen in a mold only 1/2 an inch high. It would be hard to get this many layers in a full size piece. There are six thin layers here, all made from Scenic Water. The middle white layer was poured when it was beginning to set up and as a result there are some visible bubbles in the layer.
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    Re: Làm đồ ăn mô hình

    Turning Polymer Clay Into Dolls House Chocolates
    1:12 scale chocolate box filled with a variety of miniature chocolates all made from polymer clay.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Like all dollhouse miniature foods, the illusion of reality with miniature chocolates is created by giving your miniatures the kind of detail that people expect to see. We expect various things from the look of a chocolate. We identify their fillings by how they look, the type of chocolate and the quality by the color and gloss. When you go to fill a chocolate box with realistic miniatures, pay attention to the details on particular varieties of real chocolates. Happy researching!
    The dolls house chocolates that follow are listed in order of difficulty.
    The heart shaped chocolate box above comes from the instructions for making boxes from polymer clay.
    The paper cases for the chocolates can be made from strong tissue paper or tracing paper following the instructions for making miniature pastry cases.


    Materials Useful for Making Dollhouse Scale Chocolates
    Cutters, pins, fine wire, decorative beads, artist's pastels and flat rolling blocks used to make dollhouse scale chocolates from polymer clay.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    • Polymer Clay Colors - To make miniature chocolates from polymer clay, you need two colors of brown polymer clay (a dark and a brown with more yellow (to make it more caramel or milk chocolate colored), plus some white clay mixed with a bit of translucent clay plus a bit of brown to make it a vanilla color. These chocolates can be made with any type of polymer clay. There are instructions in the Polymer Clay Color Blends for blending a series of suitable brown colors from the three primary colors of polymer clay (yellow, red and blue).
    • Baking Tile - or foil container to bake the miniatures.
    • Rolling and Shaping Tools - I use a clear acrylic block (a stamp mount) to roll even thin rolls of polymer clay. In the photo above you can also see assorted beads and cutting tools used to shape and cut the clay. For making chocolates, very thin beading wire is useful for impressing details, as is a clay blade, and different shaped beads.
    • Finishing Materials - to give chocolates a final gloss, you will need a gloss acrylic varnish. Brown and white artist's pastels are useful to give a 'cocoa' coating to white and brown truffles. Various colored sands, and very fine powders can be used to simulate colored sugars.
    • Colored Foil - can be rolled up to make very convincing foil covered chocolates. Use the thinnest colored foil you can find.
    • Measuring Tools - Most chocolates are one inch or smaller in size. If you have a scale ruler that measures in 12ths, try to keep your chocolates sized to 1/12 inch. If you have a standard ruler, make sure your chocolates are less than 1/8 inch in size.

    Make Simple Free Form Chocolates From Rolls of Clay
    Simple rolled chocolate shapes for truffles, covered peel, and bon bons, made from polymer clay and scraps of colored foil.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Soft chocolates made of ganache, or chocolate covered fruit peels are the easiest to make from polymer clay. If you want to make a full box of any particular type, roll out a fine cylinder of clay in your chosen base color, and use a single sided razor blade or a polymer clay knife to cut even pieces of clay appropriate for the size of chocolate you are making.
    To Make Chocolate Covered Peel - cut thin strips of clay and curl it into a gentle S bend using a glass headed pin or some other modelling tool. Pull up on the ends so that the strip is not perfectly flat to the surface.
    To Make Chocolate Truffles - Roll small balls or short logs of polymer clay and press the surface with the head of a pin to create rough angled surfaces like those found on truffles. Bake the polymer clay chocolates and then coat them with an appropriate color of pastel to mimic dark cocoa, cinnamon, or pulverized sugar used on white truffles.
    To Make Foil Covered Chocolates - Cut small bits of thin colored foil and use tweezers to bend the edges towards the underside of the foil. Keep turning the foil under with the tweezers until you can no longer see the edges, then crush the foil ball slightly into the shape you want (squares, circles or oblongs are the most common).
    Sugar bon bons and Decorated Chocolates - roll basic chocolate shapes and decorate them with fine grains of colored sand to resemble colored sugar. If you have micro glitter you can sometimes use that to resemble the edible glitter used by some speciality chocolate shops.


    Shaped Chocolates Cut With Paper Punches
    Heart shaped chocolates and a layered chocolate bar in dolls house scale made from polymer clay using paper punches.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    Simple paper punches can be used to cut polymer clay into special shapes. For chocolates 1/8 inch hearts, tiny butterfiles, cupids, or diamonds can be used to make various chocolates. Roll out your clay to the correct thickness for your punch and dust the clay with talcum powder or corn starch before punching it.
    For the chocolate heart pattern shown above, a dark chocolate square was punched out with a punch and baked. When hard it was laid over soft white 'chocolate' clay which was pressed up into the punched holes in the 'chocolate' layer to create a double chocolate bar with a heart motif. The pattern was cut out and can be displayed in a chocolate shop as a solid chocolate valentine, or used as the lid for a square chocolate box.


    Basic Plain Chocolate Shapes
    Dollhouse chocolates made from polymer clay with stamped and swirled surface designs.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    The classic chocolates of every box are the shapes we have all learned to recognize. All of these shapes should be coated with a thin acrylic gloss coating after baking. If you wish, you can also use a very fine glue tip and 'ice' fine lines of chocolate colored clay in a contrasting color (milk or white on dark chocolate clay) to make fine colored chocolate lines found on many quality chocolates. You can make these in any of the popular chocolate coatings, dark, milk or white.
    Make Chocolate Caramels - Chocolate caramels are usually squares with angular ridge lines across the top. You can make these lines by pulling them up with a polymer clay blade, or by marking cut lines across the angle of a simple square chocolate. If your chocolates stick to the knife when you are cutting them sand the edges to a rounder shape with fine sandpaper after they have baked. The glaze coat will cover the fact that the finish was sanded.
    Mint Leaves - Cut a long triangle or slice across a slightly flattened roll of clay and pinch one end to a point. Use the head of a pin to push on opposite sides of the triangle to give it a gentle curve. Trim the triangle to a rough leaf size, and use the edge of a pin, a piece of fine wire, or a jewelery finding with a raised vein leaf, to press into the chocolate to create leaf veins.
    Nougat - Most chocolate boxes have rectangular or oblong pieces of nougat, identified by lines across the chocolate or at a slight angle.
    Chocolate Covered Cherries - Use a fine rounded embossing tip to create a tightly swirled line on the top of a tiny ball of clay, or press a rose bead into the surface of a ball of clay to make the typical swirl on the top of a chocolate covered cherry.
    Liquor Filled Chocolates - Many of these are a short tube shape, narrower on the top than the base, sometimes with lines or raised edges on the top of the chocolate. Use a flat smooth surface to roll a thin roll of clay, angling the surface to narrow the roll on one end. Cut your chocolates from the roll where one end is narrowed, to make the chocolates narrow rolls with tapered sides. Press the head of a flat topped dressmakers pin to the top of the cylinder to make a thin rim at the top of the chocolate.
    Chocolate Logs - roll out thin rolls of clay and cut long strips for your chocolate logs (usually hazelnut ganache chocolates or other soft, nut butter flavors). Press the roll the flatten the underside slightly and use a piece of fine wire or the end of a pin to draw bark lines on the rounded top edge of the chocolate.


    Simple Canes for Striped Chocolates
    Adding two white strips to a disc of chocolate colored polymer clay to make a two toned cane for dolls house chocolates.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To make simple striped canes for fine lined chocolates, roll a half inch ball of dark 'chocolate' colored clay and press it into a disc as shown. Roll a similar sized ball of white 'chocolate' clay. Cut thin strips from the white disc and insert them into the dark disc. You can simply switch pieces around so you have a white disc with dark lines and a dark disc with white lines.
    Gently press the sections together and roll the disk into a cylinder, taking care to roll it evenly so that the colored lines do not twist. (If you roll one end of the roll and then the other, the lines will twist and swirl inside your cane).
    See the next step for the completed chocolates cut from the cane.


    Striped Dolls House Chocolates Made From Simple Canes of Polymer Clay
    Dolls house scale miniature chocolates made from a simple two strip cane of polymer clay.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    When you have rolled your striped cane down to 1/12 inch in diameter, use a sharp polymer clay blade to cut sections through the cane. If your clay is soft, you may create soft 'squiggled' lines when you cut the cane. If you wish straight lines, let the cane harden before you slice it. Pieces cut diagonally instead of straight across the cane, will have slightly different patterns. Experiment and make a range of chocolates from your clay cane by shaping or cutting them into squares, hearts, diamonds after you cut sections from the cane. You can use any of the surface techniques from the plain chocolates to decorate or shape the lined or striped chocolates if you wish.


    Shape Chocolate Hedgehogs in Dollhouse Scale
    Shaping polymer clay into balls with a pointed end, then using a pin to make chocolate mice and hedgehogs in dolls house scale.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To make the basic shape of a chocolate hedgehog or a mouse, cut a section from a roll of polymer clay, and roll one end of the piece to a slight point for the animal's nose.
    To Make a Chocolate Hedgehog - Take the head of a fine pin and press a line across the point where it joins the main shape, pressing the clay up into a flat ridge behind the pointed nose (see photo above). This will shape the prickly rim of the hedgehog. Use the point of a fine pin, or a piece of fine beading wire, to create the roughed up surface lines on the hedgehog's back (see photo next page). Mark the hedgehog's eyes on either side of its pointed nose using the point of a fine pin. See photo of a finished hedgehog on the next page.


    Shape Chocolate Mice in Dolls House Scale
    A miniature chocolate hedgehog and chocolate mouse in dolls house scale.
    Photo copyright 2010 Lesley Shepherd, Licensed to About.com Inc.
    To Make a Chocolate Mouse - Make the basic body shape for a mouse the same way you did for the hedgehog in the previous step. Cut a section from a roll of polymer clay, and roll one end of the piece to a slight point for the animal's nose. Press the head of a pin or a fine tube into the middle of the body to represent the ears (see photo above) then press the point of a pin just behind the nose to make two eyes. Roll a tiny string of polymer clay and bend it into a soft S curve. Press the curve to the back of the mouse's body at the base, and bring the tail around to one side of the mouse body and press gently into place.
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    Re: Làm đồ ăn mô hình

    A Miniature Celebration Cake for your Dolls House

    Mags Cassidy of Mags-nificent Miniatures

    Posted on 17 Feb 2011




    TERMINOLOGY Mags often uses the word 'work' when talking about clay. This simply means roll, press, roll and squeeze until the clay is soft and pliable. This is very quickly achieved with Fimo soft.
    You will need: Fimo soft in chocolate (75), white (0), indian red (24) & black (9). Fimo Classis in ochre (17) and Fimo Effects in Translucent white (14). Also required: Sand or budgerigar grit, fine ground apricot kernels, flower and leaf cutters of choice, a cake stand or board.
    Tools Required: Craft knife or razor blade, cake cutter, rolling pin, smoothing tool, a glass headed pin, 2 cocktail sticks, baking tile
    Step 1 - The Cake

    Work the brown clay until soft, roll it out and sprinkle with sand/grit and kernels.

    Roll up into a ball and squeeze together. Repeat a couple of times until you have a well textured gritty ball.

    Roll out to the required thickness, using the cutter cut out the cake and put to one side.

    Step 2 - Marzipan
    Work the ochre and transparent clay together and roll out

    Cut a circle for the top of the cake and press lightly into place

    Cut a strip for the sides and press gently around the cake
    Step 3 - The Icing
    Repeat step 2 with the icing. This is made from white, translucent and a tiny pinch of red clay worked together to achieve the colour you desire. Use your smoothing tool around the cake to smooth out the joins. You can use your fingers, but take care not to leave any fingerprints.

    Step 4 - Decoration
    Take the left over pink clay and roll out. Cut a few flowers and leaves for the top of the cake. To make rosettes to go around the base of the cake, take a tiny ball of clay. Using 2 cocktail sticks and press into each side of the ball to make indents. Repeat on the other 2 sides to produce a neat little rosette. You will need quite a few to go around the cake.

    Step 5 - Cutting a slice, texturing & baking
    Cut out as many slices as you'd like from the cake with a sharp blade.

    Work small pieces of black clay and red mixed with translucent clay, roll each into a separate snake and cut tiny pieces which are then rolled into miniscule balls.
    Lay a slice on its side and gently work a pin head in circular movements over the cut surface of the cake. Repeat on the cut slices and the main cake until you are happy with the resulting texture.
    Add tiny balls of black and translucent red to simulate cherries and currants in the cake.

    Carefully place the cake onto a baking tile or foil lined tray and bake according to manufacturers instructions.
    Editor's Comments: You can always use colours of clay that are similar, and the icing doesn't have to be pink. Perhaps make the cakes in a club where you can share the cost of the clay between all the members. If you don' have a cake cutter, you can always make the shape by hand, or by cutting round a coin, it is just neater and easier with the cutter. Use your imagination and have fun. Ann
    If you've enjoyed this DIY article, why not treat yourself to a copy of the magazine, or better still, why not take out a subscription so that you never miss an issue.
    Woman of short-lived passions

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    Re: Làm đồ ăn mô hình

    Make a Miniature Dollhouse Cherry Pie

    19 March 2012 1,837 views 6 Comments
    by rhonda



    If you're a regular here, you know that I've been obsessively making minis for a while now. I've made all kinds of little odds and ends that are starting to add up to entire rooms and scenes! So far, though, there has been one thing glaringly missing from my collection: food! Are your dollhouse residents hungry? Bake them a tiny pie! (No really, you actually bake it!)
    Project estimate:
    • Bottle cap, on hand
    • Polymer clay (tan and red), on hand or about $4
    • Spray paint (optional), on hand or $1 and up
    • Toothpick, on hand
    • Clear nail polish, on hand or $1*
    Total: Free and up
    *Note: I've heard mixed things about clear nail polish and polymer clay. Some people warn of disasters, while other people say they've used it for years and never had a problem. Use at your own risk! If you'd rather be safe than sorry, you can also use Sculpey Gloss Glaze, which you can find in the $3 to $4 range.

    Before you can use the clay, you will need to condition it. (Straight out of the package it is too stiff to mold properly.) You can do this by running it through a pasta machine multiple times until it becomes pliable; if you don't have a pasta machine, knead it between your fingers until it is soft enough to work with. Optionally, you may choose to paint your bottle cap.

    Press a chunk of tan clay into the bottle cap. Press your thumb down in the center of the cap so that there is a slight depression in the clay at the center of the cap and a little excess clay spreads over the edges of the cap.

    Roll a bunch of teeny-tiny balls of red clay and pile them in depression on the center of the cap. Add them until they form a rounded, slightly heaping pile.

    Switching back to the tan clay, roll a long, very skinny "worm" shape. Cut the worm into short segments and press it into the top of the pie to form stripes.

    Turn the pie and repeat in the other direction to complete the lattice top.

    To give the edges of the pie crust a crimped appearance, use the tip of a toothpick to press tiny indentations around the perimeter.


    Bake the pie according to the directions on the clay packaging. Allow to cool completely, then seal using clear nail polish.
    Woman of short-lived passions

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