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Chủ đề: Everything about Character animation

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    Everything about Character animation

    1. Character design
    hands & feet, face and hair

    2. Dynamic character posing

    line of action
    weight and gravity
    expressive and balanced composition

    3. Facial expression

    mouth and eyes designs and the ways to create different moods

    4. Story

    ideas, concepts and how to turn them into a complete captivating story

    5. Set up your animation

    splitting and naming layers in Illustrator
    import it in After Effects
    create a flexible rig.

    6. Key animation techniques

    Principles: weight, anticipation, recoil and follow through.
    Squash & stretch, whip and wave motion, and offsets.

    7. Secondary motion: animating clothes, hair and adding some smears or action lines to emphasize the motion.


    8. Walk cycle, run cycle.


    9. Pose to pose: Plan your shot and all the further steps to achieve a really nice result instead of getting lost and spend a lot of time on experiments when animating each movement one by one.


    10. Acting and timing:

    body language, facial expressions, importance of the eyes and, of course, timings

    11. Facial expressions and lip-sync

    how to animate transitions between emotions and get equipped with the alphabet of lip-sync.
    Lần sửa cuối bởi HuynhNhu1, ngày 28-10-2019 lúc 03:22 PM.

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    Re: Everything about Character animation

    21 Foundations of Animation



    1. Appeal
    2. Strong design
    3. Staging a scene
    4. Acting and pantomime
    5. Keys and breakdowns
    6. Straight ahead and pose to pose
    7. Thumbnails and planning
    8. Timing, spacing, and easing
    9. Squash and stretch
    10. Arcs
    11. Primary and secondary action
    12. Silhouette
    13. Lines of action and reversals
    14. Anticipation, overshoot, and settle
    15. Opposing action
    16. Counterpose
    17. Leading action
    18. Breaking joints
    19. Overlap and follow-through
    20. Accents and dialog
    21. Exaggeration
    Lần sửa cuối bởi HuynhNhu1, ngày 28-10-2019 lúc 03:26 PM.

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    Re: Everything about Character animation

    Let’s take a quick introduction to each foundation, with examples.

    Appeal does not merely mean ‘cute’ – though cute characters do tend to have instant appeal – especially those with large eyes or button eyes (making them a bit like teddy bears):Of course cute characters have appeal, but villains can also have appeal, and ugly or villainous characters can have appeal:

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Drawing Cartoon Characters’)
    It may help to think of appeal as ‘charisma’, ‘interest, or ‘charm’.
    Characters are constructed out of basic forms like spheres, cylinders and boxes, with great care taken to make sure that the designs remain on-model throughout a production.Model sheets dictate the correct proportions and designs of characters.

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Drawing Cartoon Characters’)


    Incorrect placement of characters and camera results in a banal shot, boring to animate and boring to watch. Correct staging communicates character and story elements, and is visually interesting. In the right panel, we see that the small character is having a very hard time convincing his friends; in the left panel it is not obvious what is happening.
    The power dynamic between employee and boss is much clearer in panel 2, below:

    Different placements of the camera can produce radically different shots. One common technique is to draw an imaginary line between the characters, and to stage the sequence on one side of that line. In the illustration below, there are two possible sides, A and B. To be consistent, the shots should be on one side or the other.
    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Storyboarding’)

    A classic performance test is to draw a sack of flour or simple object in various emotions and actions. It should be possible to ‘read’ the pose without seeing a face or body parts:Animation acting has more in common with pantomime, or the physical comedy of the silent era. Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd and Chaplin are great references. Strong poses are preferred to communicate emotions and inner states of characters.
    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Drawing Cartoon Characters’)

    Keys are the main poses in a scene. In the head turn below there are two keys, in black.
    Breakdowns are the main drawings between the keys. By adding interesting actions to the breakdowns, your animation will be looser and more interesting.

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Breakdowns & Thumbnails’)


    The two animation methods are ‘straight ahead‘ and ‘pose to pose‘. In straight ahead, the first key is drawn, then the second, then the third, and so on. The scene below was drawn straight ahead from left to right. I had no idea where I was going other than I wanted the character to be extremely upset.In Pose to Pose, the first key is drawn, then the last. The intermediate keys are then blocked in, followed by breakdowns.
    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Breakdowns & Thumbnails’)
    Straight ahead produces looser animation, but it is easier to lose control of the action. Pose to pose allows greater control, but can sometimes be a little stiffer than straight ahead.
    Before animating, it is wise to sketch thumbnails. They can be stick figures or crude:
    The more complex the action, the more important it is to thumbnail. I like to thumbnail on lined notepaper, as it’s easier to keep volumes consistent, or to work in depth.


    Skipping the thumbnail process is a false economy. With a little effort, very complex actions can be planned as thumbs, allowing you to see the entire action in a single image. Thumbnailing combines the strenghts of straight ahead and pose to pose in one method.
    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Breakdowns & Thumbnails’)


    Timing is the frame number that the animator assigns to the key frames. Spacing refers to the position of the breakdown and inbetweens between those keys.
    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Tips & Tricks’)
    Two animations can have the same timing but totally different spacing, depending on how the animator spaces the inbetween frames.


    To create a natural or cartoony character, we squash and stretch them. The degree of squash and stretch can help determine how natural or cartoony the character is.

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Tips & Tricks’)
    The more squash and stretch, the cartoonier. It’s important that volumes are maintained on the squash and stretch drawings, or the character will appear to grow in mass.

    Most things move in arcs, or curved paths.
    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Tips & Tricks’)


    Most often the primary action is the body or character, with clothing or hair responding to the primary action.

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Animating Hair & Clothing’)


    A character’s pose should be easy to interpret based on silhouette alone. No internal detail should be needed for the essential information of the scene to read. A good silhouette communicates the physical action and the emotion of the character.

    (Image from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Drawing Cartoon Characters’)


    A line of action is an imaginary line that runs from the base of the character to their head, or along the strongest direction of physical action.
    (Image from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Drawing Cartoon Characters’)

    Build strong poses around a simple line of action – usually a C or an S curve. If a pose is built upon this basic form a stronger silhouette is easier to design.

    (Image from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Drawing Cartoon Characters’)
    Applying this principle to animation, we find the power of reversals.


    (Image from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Animating Hair & Clothing’)
    Strong transitions occur when the line of action is reversed between keys. It gives characters flexibility. In the classic example above we see a whip or tail cycle from one C curve into an S curve, then into the reverse. The principle also applies to poses; below, a snap from one line of action into its reverse creates a sense of flexibility and/or power:


    (Image from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Drawing Cartoon Characters’)


    Before we move in one direction, it is common to antipate that action by moving in the opposite direction.
    In this very simple animation you see an anticipation on #7, followed by overshoot on #11, then settle on #16 (which completes the cycle or action).

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Tips & Tricks’)


    If a part of the body moves in one direction, there is usually a part of the body that moves in the opposite direction. This is a natural way for a character to remain in balance.

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Tips & Tricks’)


    If a part of the body moves in one direction, there is usually a part of the body that moves in the opposite direction, twisting or ‘torqueing’ the body.

    This is an opposing action but taken to another degree (or rotated). This technique was used by Renaissance artists to create lifelike and dynamic poses.
    Counterpose is essential when animating physical actions like walks or runs.
    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Tips & Tricks’)


    A given action can be led by a particular part of the body.The sections in red are the leading actions of this zombie walk.

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Animate Monsters & Aliens’)


    This is a great technique for loosening an action and giving it that classic, loose limbed feeling. A broken joint is an extreme example of a leading action. In the case of the mummy below, we lead with the elbow so much that it seems to ‘snap’ for a moment on #25. It snaps back into its resting angle on #33.
    The result is a sensation of looseness (but just for a moment, as the rest of the mummy walk is stiff and creepy):

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Animate Monsters & Aliens’)


    Different parts of the body move at different speeds. They can begin and end their actions at different times – their timing is said to ‘overlap’. Notice how the belly drags, moves behind the main character, and only settles into the final rest about eight frames after the main body.

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Tips & Tricks’)


    Accents are the strongest points of motion in a scene: these are transitions that move at greater distance and/or speed. They’re most important in dialog scenes, where the voice rises and falls in pitch and emphasis.
    Exaggeration is left to last for a reason. Disney would often see a finished scene, something that worked perfectly well, and ask the animator to ‘plus’ it. In other words, is there anything you can do to squeeze a little more out of it. Obviously, this is something that you should really do BEFORE you animate your scene! However, it’s worth remembering that there’s always room for improvement, or for that little bit extra.Any pose can be pushed further. How far can depend on the studio style. Some studios, for example, Warner Brothers, went to great extremes with the ‘Looney Tunes’ series. But push the pose or expression too far and it breaks!

    Facial expressions can also be exaggerated!
    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Drawing Cartoon Characters’)
    The most extreme form of exaggeration is the world of ‘cartoon physics’, which reached its extreme in the ‘Looney Tunes’ series of the 1940s and 50s.
    Animators do have to satisfy basic physical expectations. Characters should follow arcs, and have a center of mass. Eye catching glitches should be avoided. Note how the hammer spins around its center of mass:

    (Images from my Lynda / Linkedin course ‘Tips & Tricks’)
    That said, animators should NOT feel constrained by strict Newtonian ideas of motion. The beauty of the medium is that the everyday laws of physics can be applied in comic or magical ways, as in the character who doesn’t fall until he realises that he’s in mid-air.
    Even in this case, the character must accelerate in a logical sequence (even if it is not realistic). So the feet fall first, speeding as they go, followed by the waist, then the chest, then the neck, then the head.

    Credit: http://www.angryanimator.com/word/
    Lần sửa cuối bởi HuynhNhu1, ngày 28-10-2019 lúc 04:49 PM.

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    Re: Everything about Character animation

    Animal animation



    https://design.tutsplus.com/articles/how-to-draw-animals-horses-their-anatomy-and-poses--vector-18887


    1. The Skeleton of a Horse

    Step 1

    A skeleton is the base for a whole body, so we need to learn it to understand the animal's movement and poses. But don't worry, you're not supposed to count the ribs. Just take a good look at this.






    Step 2

    Use the skeleton to see the basic structure of every pose. Remember all the joints (circles) and bones (lines), their placement and proportions between them, and you're able to draw every horse!

    Step 3

    It's important to remember that hooves aren't feet - they're fingers. Actual feet start at the joints that looks like knees and elbows to us. So, a horse doesn't have a knee in the forelegs - it's a wrist!

    Step 4

    A pony is a horse too. Just remember it has a shorter neck and legs - the rest stays the same.

    Step 5

    A foal is the opposite to a pony - just look at its unproportionally long legs!

    2. A Look at Horse Poses

    Now you know how to draw a stationary horse, but let's be honest - it's boring. To bring a pose to life you need to understand how horses move, and, more importantly, how they don't. If you guess the pose, you may accidentally confuse trot with gallop, making the picture unrealistic, no matter how much time you have spent on drawing the muscles and light reflexes.
    Step 1

    A "walk" is first and the slowest horse movement. In this pose a horse is standing on the ground with three feet, while one foot is raised. It's a four-beat gait (four knocks can be heard).

    Walk
    Step 2

    Trot is a kind of gait that horses use for long distances. In this pose a horse moves its legs in diagonal pairs, in a two-beat rhythm.

    Trot
    Step 3

    Canter is faster than a trot, but slower than a gallop. It's a three-beat gait, and a horse uses one of its hind legs to move the others forward.

    Canter
    Step 4

    A gallop is very similar to canter, but it's faster and uses a four-beat rhythm. Also, there's a mistake that used to be done by masters of painting. Do you remember painted horses in gallop, with all the legs stretched in the air? It doesn't work like this. When a horse is extending its legs, at least one of them stays on the ground. The "suspension" phase happens when all the legs are bent under the body.

    Gallop
    The difference between canter and gallop
    Don't ever draw this pose
    Step 5

    A very cool, yet a bit uncomfortable pose for a horse is prancing. This pose is very hard to maintain for a longer time, and it works like a jump of excitement for a horse. To draw it naturally, you need to place the hind legs at a correct angle.

    Step 6

    Horses are able to sleep in standing position, but it doesn't mean they can't lay down. Actually, they need to lay down to take a real rest. They usually lay on one side, with legs bent, but they can also sleep "flat", with whole body relaxed.


    Step 7

    Horses look very gracefully when jumping. Also, when a horse is being suspended in the air, its pose is perfect for a flying Pegasus.


    Step 8

    So, that was all about the poses. You can now choose your own for your picture.
    The Muscles of a Horse

    Step 1

    Muscles give shape to the body, so you need to learn them too. Unfortunately, a horse's muscular body can be seen very clearly under the skin, so if you'll want to skip this step, your horses will never look realistic.
    If you want to draw a horse quickly, here comes a simplified scheme. It will let you draw a good shape of the body without diving into details.

    Step 2

    Here comes a more complicated structure. It's all you need to draw a believable body. You may think you won't ever need it, but without them the skin would be flat.


    Step 3

    Add muscles to your pose.

    Step 4

    Next thing is the skin. It covers the muscles, hiding the sharp borders between them. The bulges of muscles under the skin reflect the light individually, making the body surface irregular and full of depth.

    Step 5

    Horse breeds can be divided into hot-bloods, cold-bloods, and warm bloods. Hot-bloods are slim, long-legged and nobly looking (think Arabian horses), fast and intelligent. Cold-bloods are typical draft horses (like these from Skyrim) - big, heavy and muscular, but also slow-thinking and gentle. Warm bloods are a mixture of both.

    Step 6

    Erase the lines of muscles that touch each other.

    4. Draw the Hooves of a Horse

    Step 1

    Hooves are, in fact, a horse's nails. Horses are odd-toed, which means their hooves aren't split. Drawing split hooves is permissible only if your horse is going to be a unicorn.
    To draw a hoof from the side view, draw a line extending the leg's length. Then draw a rhombus touching the line with one corner.

    Step 2

    Cover the rhombus with a kind of cap.

    Step 3

    Create an outline over these shapes.

    Step 4

    Add a bit of hair and draw a rough texture of a nail.

    Step 5

    To draw a hoof from the front, draw a rounded, slightly tapered shape at the bottom of the line.

    Step 6

    Cover it with a cap.

    Step 7

    Create the outline, as before.

    Step 8

    Add the hair and textures. It's done!

    Step 9

    Drawing a hoof from the back is equally easy. Start with the same rounded shape like before, but this time make the cap big and falling.

    Step 10

    Create the outline.

    Step 11

    Again, add the hair and texture.

    Step 12

    My horse now has hooves.

    5. Draw a Horse Head

    Step 1

    To draw a head from profile, start with three circles - one for the main part of the skull, one for the muzzle and one for a nostril.

    Step 2

    Connect the circles and add an ear.

    Step 3

    Divide the "muzzle" circle into three parts to draw the lips.

    Step 4

    Draw a nostril inside the "nostril" circle and draw two lines from the nostril to the ear.

    Step 5

    Draw a line laying on the two muzzle circles, then divide the main circle into halves with a line parallel to it.

    Step 6

    Divide the upper half into halves again. Use the guide lines you've just created to place the eye. If you're drawing a foal, make the eye bigger.

    Step 7

    Now you can sketch the details, including the muscles under the skin. Remember the cheeks are flat, not really round.

    Step 8

    To draw a horse head from the front, start with an oval and a circle.

    Step 9

    Add the nostrils, using a guide line across the circle.

    Step 10

    Connect the oval and the circle, add the ears and the forehead.

    Step 11

    Add the eyes, using guide lines splitting the oval to fourths.

    Step 12

    Add the details, using the head anatomy for more realistic look.

    6. Draw Horse Eyes

    Step 1

    Draw a circle and divide it into four sections. Cross it with a line to cut it in half, then add another line just above it.

    Step 2

    Draw a lemon shape using the guide lines.

    Step 3

    Draw the eyelids.

    Step 4

    Draw the eyelashes. They should be straight and dense.

    Step 5

    The pupil should be horizontal, but most likely it won't be visible at all from distance, since horses have rather dark, brown eyes. If you're drawing a whole horse and the eye is just a detail, draw it all black. You'll need to add the pupil only if the eye is blue.

    Step 6

    Draw and shade the area around the eye. It's very important for its overall shape. Also, add a shine to the eyelashes to make them stand out.

    Step 7

    To draw an eye from the front, start with a vertical ellipse and proper guide lines.

    Step 8

    Add the eyelids.

    Step 9

    Draw the eyeball covered with upper eyelid.

    Step 10

    Add the eyelashes.

    Step 11

    Draw the pupil.

    Step 12

    Add a final polish to the eye.

    7. Draw Horse Ears

    Step 1

    To draw a horse ear, start with a circle (or a half of it, if it's a front view), then divide it into four parts and use them as guide lines.


    8. Draw a Horse Muzzle

    Step 1

    A horse's nostrils are quite big, they also can open wider when there's need for more oxygen. The easiest way to draw them is to remember they shape - they look like a 6 number or a reversed comma. So, always start with an oval and place the "6" (or reversed 6) inside, adjusting the 6's roundness to a needed size.

    Step 2

    When drawing the muzzle, emphasize only the lower lip and leave the corner falling. Don't forget about whiskers too - horses have a lot of them!

    Step 3

    It's my horse with his head added.

    9. Horse Hair

    Step 1

    A horse's mane grows in a straight line. The strands are usually consistent in length, and they're dense enough to cover one side of the neck.

    Step 2

    A horse tail is actually much shorter than it seems. There are long strands of hair growing out of it, and they can be moved only with the tail.

    Step 3

    Very long hair covering the hooves is called feathering. It's characteristic for draft horses.

    Step 4

    Wind makes the mane fabulous!

    You're Done!

    That was a long tutorial, but I'm sure now you're a horse expert!

    Lần sửa cuối bởi HuynhNhu1, ngày 28-10-2019 lúc 05:14 PM.

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    Re: Everything about Character animation

    Mẹo vẽ nhân vật nhất quán, từ mọi góc độ

    Keeping a Character Consistent



    If your eyes are one size on one view they will be the same proportion ( but not necessarily the same shape) on another angled view, like a side-profile.
    Nhân vật dù ở góc độ nào cũng sẽ có cùng tỉ lệ (không cần phải có shape giống).

    Using a simple "cross" grid-line on a face ( a centre-line and a interesecting eye-line) can help you place features on a face consistently. .
    Khung lưới đơn giản trên mặt (đường chia giữa mặt và đường cắt qua mắt) để đặt mắt mũi miệng nhất quán.

    When I design a character, I do a 3/4 angle first because that has both the face-on and profile angles combined.
    Thường nên thiết kế nhân vật ở góc 3/4 trước, góc này phối hợp cả góc chính diện và góc 1/2.

    That way I can map out the face-on view and the profile seperately, and then alter the structure on those views so they are appealing images in their own right.
    Làm thế thì có thể xác định góc chính diện và góc 1/2, rồi thay đổi cấu trúc để hình hấp dẫn.

    A face-on view gives to height, and width, plus placement of features, but no depth. A 3/4 angle gives you a suggestion of depth, plus the other elements and a profile gives you the absolute depth value, but no sense of the width seen in the face-on view.
    Góc chính diện cho ta chiều cao, chiều ngang, vị trí mắt mũi miệng, nhưng không có chiều sâu. Còn góc 3/4 có cả chiều sâu và các yếu tố khác. Góc 1/2 cho ta giá trị chiều sâu, nhưng ko cho biết chiều ngang như góc chính diện.

    A rear view is redundant except for details on the rear side.
    Góc nhìn từ phía sau là thừa, trừ phi mình muốn vẽ chi tiết ở sau lưng.

    The task here is to eyeball the features from one view to another, creating a appealing look in each view.
    Nhiệm vụ của ta là nhìn theo hình khối các đặc điểm của mắt mũi miệng từ góc nhìn này sang góc nhìn kia để góc nhìn nào cũng hấp dẫn.

    Your ability to mentally visualize the structures in the drawing as they rotate in space will greatly help you.
    Khả năng tưởng tượng trong đầu cấu trúc khi xoay tròn trong không gian sẽ rất hữu ích.

    The EASIEST way to develop this kind of skill is to study and draw from real objects.
    Cách dễ làm nhất để luyện được kỹ năng này là nghiên cứu và vẽ từ đồ vật thật..

    I suggest using well-sculpted toys or sculptures and then slowly work on your own characters. You can hold them in any attitude and study them as long as you need to.
    Tôi khuyên nên dùng đồ chơi và đồ điêu khắc đẹp, tạo dáng, nghiên cứu nghiền ngẫm rồi tạo ra nhân vật cho riêng mình.




    There are questions I keep instinctively in my mind when I draw my characters:
    Đây là những câu hỏi tôi luôn đặt ra khi vẽ nhân vật:


    -What are the shapes of every body part?
    shape của từng bộ phận là gì?

    -how does the faces/eyes/nose/mouth/arms/legs' shape look like?
    shape của mặt, mắt, mũi, miệng, tay, chân trông giống gì?

    -are they long? short? pointy? squarish? round?
    dài? ngắn? nhọn? vuông? tròn?

    -are they straight? curvy?
    thẳng? cong?

    -how steep are the angles?
    góc nhọn hay tù?

    -are they thin or wide?
    hẹp hay rộng?

    -How far apart each body parts are from each other?
    các bộ phận cách nhau bao xa?

    -does the gap between the eyes near or far? ...
    mắt gần nhau hay xa? vân vân ...

    What are each of the parts sizes in relation to each other?
    kích cỡ các bộ phận tương quan thế nào?

    -is the eyes bigger than the nose? etc.
    mắt có to hơn mũi không?

    -is the head bigger than the body
    đầu có to hơn mình không?

    -how many heads does the entire body measure up?
    thân người cao mấy đầu?

    -does the hand cover up the entire face?
    bàn tay có che hết mặt không?

    Believe it or not characters has their own sets of shapes and measurements and that what's make them who they are. Any slight adjustments can cause the character to go "off-model"
    Mỗi nhân vật có nhóm shape và số đo riêng của mình, khác một chút thôi là không còn là nó nữa.



    Tham khảo bài viết sau:
    Turn around sheet

    http://www.simplearttips.com/tutoria...rnaround-sheet

    Bước 1

    Choose a pose that conveys your character's personality.
    Chọn tư thế cho thấy tính cách của nhân vật.

    For example, if your character is shy, you could draw them slightly hunched over, with their knees bent and pigeon-toed, as if they're trying to hide themselves from the outside world.

    Use relatively simple poses.
    Nên chọn tư thế đơn giản.




    Draw these three poses free hand, without restricting them to fit within a certain height.
    Tay thoải mái không cầm gì.

    Try to keep the proportions relatively close to each other.
    Ráng giữ tỉ lệ mắt, mũi, miệng, mặt gần như nhau. Tay, quần áo cùng chiều dài, tóc cùng cỡ...

    For example, try to keep the eyes, nose, and mouth at around the same height within the face in each pose, the hands and clothes at about the same length, the hair within the same size, etc.

    Bước 2

    Taking into consideration the structure of your character and their geometric build up. This will help you maintain the shapes cohesive as they turn in space. (i.e. oval head, cylindrical legs and arms, cone torso, etc.)
    Để ý đến cấu trúc hình thể, để khi xoay trong không gian vẫn giữ đúng shape (ví dụ đầu hình ô-van, chân tay hình trụ, thân hình nón v.v...)











    Keep in mind that foreheads, noses and chins often protrude noticeably, as well as the back of the head. These are key in creating an appealing and believable head shape.
    Nhớ là trán, mũi, cằm, sau đầu nhô rõ. Đây là key để tạo một shape đầu thu hút và hợp lý.

    Eyes rest within eye sockets, which will make them much less visible in profile view. Think of the volume of the shapes and how they would look from a particular angle.
    Mắt nằm trong hố mắt, nên hình 1/2 sẽ ít thấy. Nghĩ đến khối của shape trong 1 góc nhìn.

    Flat shapes are boring and do little to create the illusion of volume in a drawing. Even if your character is skinny, their body will have mass and volume.
    Shape bẹt trông chán, cho nên hãy tạo cảm giác khối cho hình vẽ. Dù nhân vật có ốm cỡ nào thì thân cũng có khối.


    Step 3

    To create the back and back three-quarter views, take your front and three-quarter views and flip them horizontally to use as a reference. I scanned mine and flipped them in Photoshop.
    Để tạo góc nhìn sau lưng, và lưng
    3/4 , cho lật ngang góc chính diện và 3/4. Không có app, thì úp hình lại, rồi scan bằng light box.
















    When you see the face in your flipped sketch, imagine what the back of the head would look like. Is the character wearing a hat? What kind of hairstyle do they have?
    Tưởng tượng sau đầu nhân vật ra sao. Có đội nón không? Tóc kiểu gì?

    When you see the torso, picture what the back of it would look like. Is the character standing up straight or hunched over? Would the torso be pointing toward the viewer or away from him? (in my case it's pointing away).
    Đứng thẳng thớm hay cong lưng, hướng về người xem hay ngửa ra sau.

    When you see the feet and hands, picture how much of the toes and fingers you would see from behind. Would you see them at all?
    Hình dung nhìn thấy được ngón tay ngón chân từ sau lưng không? thấy hết hay một phần?


    Bước 4

    Make necessary adjustments to make the figures align properly.
    Canh hành cho nhân vật cùng tỉ lệ.


















    More Examples











    Turnaround model sheets for my characters Luther and Sloan.


    Lần sửa cuối bởi HuynhNhu1, ngày 29-10-2019 lúc 01:58 PM.

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    Re: Everything about Character animation

    Master turnaround model sheet with the AMB Animation Academy Character Turnaround Study Pack.

    https://ambanimation.com/ambaa/amb-animation-academy-products/master-character-turnaround-model-sheet/

































































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